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Last Post by kc0arf
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Panther (10.3) reads NTFS volumes by default.

However, it only supports "limited" writting to NTFS volumes.
You're better off using a FAT32 volume if you need to read/write between a Mac and a PC.

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Hello,

Agree on the NTFS stuff. You want to avoid writing to an NTFS disk outside of a Microsoft OS environment. There is just no way to apply the proper NTFS permissions unless you are running inside the environment that setup the bigger picture. How would your OS X, for example, know about Windoze Domain SID's?

If you need to write, consider setting up that NTFS partition on a Windoze computer, and share it over a network.

Christian

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I have a commertial NTFS driver I use to write files under linux, I rarly use windows. But since the hard disk is in a USB Hard disk enclosure I feel i need a journaling filesystem. Plus its a 160 Gig hard disk, so there would be alot of wasted space with small files unless I made 4 partitions, or something of the like.

But how this all came about really, Is im considering installing MacOS X on my mac and i need NTFS read support, to make it a decient idea.

The other problem I have is that I own a 800mhz iBook G4 with the stock standard 256 meg of ram, I don't feel this will cope with OSX. Is there any tricks i should use to install osx so it runs fast ?

Im really dreading installing os x here, it could turn into 3 days of solid work putting another operating system on it :P

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The other problem I have is that I own a 800mhz iBook G4 with the stock standard 256 meg of ram, I don't feel this will cope with OSX. Is there any tricks i should use to install osx so it runs fast ?

It will definitely "cope" with OS X. The only thing you'll need for it to run "faster" is more RAM. More RAM means less time swapping, which will equate with "faster" OS/app response.

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Hello,

RAM is the answer for you. But in laptops, you need to be careful, as you have limited amounts of slots inside... so if you are going to invest in RAM, make the conscious decision to get more than you need initially. I would recommend at least 512 MB, and if you are planning on hanging onto the laptop for a couple years yet, see if you can get into the 800's.

My laptop is a Powerbook G3 from 1999 (Lombardi), and I got it with 256, and took it to 384 when I upgraded to OS X. I would like to take it further, but am planning a hardware swap one of these days, and go after a new G4 / G5 laptop.

OS X @ 256 will work with one or two normal (Safari / Mail) applications open. If you are going to do Photoshop, Quark, or programming, then get yourself in the 512 - 1024 range.

Christian

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