Nokia reveals a mobile phone literally made for sharing

happygeek

Nokia recently undertook a survey of consumers in emerging markets and exposed a new trend: mobile phone sharing. Apparently, more than 50 percent of those surveyed in India and Pakistan, plus almost 30 percent in Vietnam, either already share or would be willing to share the use of their mobile phone with family or friends. Alex Lambeek, Vice President of Entry Devices with Nokia does not as the name suggests deal with doorbells, but rather the lower end of the handset product line. Lambeek reckons that phone sharing is a logical trend in the less mature markets, saying "more and more families are purchasing a mobile phone for the entire family to use, not just the head of the household."

In response, Nokia has announced a handset that is made to share. Literally made to share, from the ground up. The Nokia 1209 really goes the whole 9 yards as far as sharing is concerned, by offering cost management features built in so as to add to the ease and convenience of dividing up a mobile phone between more than one person. Cost management features include the pre-paid cost tracker application to keep tabs on who has been spending what on calls. I also rather like the multiple phone- book idea, allowing up to five people to store personal contact details and up to 200 numbers on a single phone.

Although the trend might well be in emerging countries only at the moment, and Nokia is targeting the handset in these less mature markets, there seems no real reason why it should not catch on elsewhere. Families on a budget are not limited to India, Pakistan and Vietnam after all...

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About the Author

A freelance technology journalist for 30 years, I have been a Contributing Editor at PC Pro (one of the best selling computer magazines in the UK) for most of them. As well as currently contributing to Forbes.com, The Times and Sunday Times via Raconteur Special Reports, SC Magazine UK, Digital Health, IT Pro and Infosecurity Magazine, I am also something of a prolific author. My last book, Being Virtual: Who You Really are Online, which was published in 2008 as part of the Science Museum TechKnow Series by John Wiley & Sons. I am also the only three times winner (2006, 2008, 2010) of the BT Information Security Journalist of the Year title, and was humbled to be presented with the ‘Enigma Award’ for a ‘lifetime contribution to information security journalism’ in 2011 despite my life being far from over...

Thinka 40 Posting Whiz Team Colleague

Interesting. So would this work in the same way you can have more than one user account on a computer? And you have to select the account at Startup? In which case, wouldn't that take up more resources, and be more expensive?

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