[COLOR="Red"][B]UPDATE: see author's comments after article[/B][/COLOR] When you develop for mobile devices these days, you pretty much have two paths you can take: You can use the OS manufacturer's SDK and develop native apps, or you can create an application that runs in the device's web browser. Developing for the web browser is often an easier path for many reasons. First, you can bypass any restrictions put into place by the app's marketplace. You can just post a link to the site hosting the app. Then the app, which is written in HTML and JavaScript, will just run in the …

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[ATTACH=right]19321[/ATTACH]If you're serious about developing Android apps, there's only one platform to build and test them on, and that's the Samsung Nexus S. Why? Because first and foremost, the Nexus S runs pure Android. Not only is Samsung's Nexus S, released in December, one of the most beautiful phones on the market, and the only one with a curved glass screen, it also contains no add-ons, overlays or UI enhancements of any kind. Yes, the Nexus S is all Android. There are no carrier-specific or Samsung-specific apps, drivers or features. That means that if your app runs here, it's reasonable …

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Last week, Microsoft released a set of tools for developing software for the new Windows Phone 7 using Visual Basic. In order to use the tools, you have to have Visual Studio 2010 Professional or better (right now the Express versions don't work, although I've heard that will change). But here's the catch: You're coding for Silverlight. You're building Silverlight apps that run on Windows Phone 7. However, that's not necessarily a bad thing. Normally I have my reservations about Silverlight in browsers on desktops, because that's just one more runtime that needs to be downloaded and installed next to, …

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Have you ever wanted to write your own code to create software for the Mac, iPhone or even the iPad but have never actually programmed on a Mac platform? Great, then this new book by Tim Isted is for you. Tim has been coding for the Mac for 15 years, and now he's sharing that knowledge with a wider audience of Mac coding newbies through the Beginning Mac Programming book. [attach]15687[/attach]Insisting that he will take the reader on the fastest and easiest route to releasing software, even if they have never written a single line of code before, Tim is …

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The End.