Example using the timeit module:

def my_function():
    return results

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import timeit
    t = timeit.Timer("my_function()", "from __main__ import my_function")
    print t.timeit(1000)

Note that timeit() defaults to 1,000,000 iterations. If your function is somewhat slow, you may want to specify the number of iterations (1000 in the example above).

You can also use Python's module profile:

import profile

def get_primes3(n):
    if n < 2:  return []
    if n == 2: return [2]
    nums = range(3, n, 2)
    idx = 0
    while idx <= (n - 1)**0.5 - 2:
        for j in xrange( idx + nums[idx], n//2 - 1, nums[idx] ):
            # replace nonprime with zero (False)
            nums[j] = 0
        idx += 1
        while idx < n - 2:
            if nums[idx] != 0:
                break
            idx += 1
    # remove all zero items
    return [2] + [x for x in nums if x != 0]

profile.run('get_primes3(15000)')

"""
result of profile.run

         5 function calls in 0.004 CPU seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(range)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(setprofile)
        1    0.003    0.003    0.004    0.004 <module3>:3(get_primes3)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.004    0.004 <string>:1(?)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.004    0.004 profile:0(get_primes3(15000))
        0    0.000             0.000          profile:0(profiler)
"""

And if you mean something very simple to time some program once, use datetime.

import datetime
import time
start_time = datetime.datetime.now()
time.sleep(2)
print datetime.datetime.now() - start_time
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