I am a beginner I spent many hours studying c++ books and online tutorials, I am sure I am competent enough to become a good programmer but I cant wrap my mind around how c++ (or any programming language for that matter) works.

My question is, How do I understand the fundamentals of programming, the basic laws. So i can use that to teach myself how to program because I am sure I can.

1) find yourself a little project to program
2) program it
3) sooner than later you will understand "the fundamentals of programming, the basic laws."

To understand the fundamentals, just work out a program and see if it produces what you want it to. That's how I learned really.

Fundamentals are things like remember your semi-colons at the end of code lines, close anything you opened (whether that be braces, brackets, parenthesis, quotes, or files), comment tags and system ("pause"); are your friends, and make it easy for you to read.

There's nothing really ground breaking you need to know other then those things, which become second nature after a while of using them.

You should probably sift around on google, and especially wikipedia to answer those questions.

Programming

C Programming Language

Forth

Compiler

-Alex

Eh that's not exactly what I meant. I'm going to write a specific question, please answer if you can, thanks.

Q. Is there a c++ dictionary of inputs I can use?

That is the only question I can think of because I'm so confused about how programming works.

(Note: I can follow along with lessons in books but I never learn anything that I can use to work on my own projects.

C++ can be a bit overwhelming to teach yourself. There's a lot of very specific syntaxes that you have got to get comfortable with first. I taught myself qbasic inside and out when I was about 12, which helps me immensely with c++, even though the languages are completely different. If time isn't an issue, I would sugguest doing the same (if not with qbasic then another highly simplified language)

To understand the fundamentals, just work out a program and see if it produces what you want it to. That's how I learned really.

Fundamentals are things like remember your semi-colons at the end of code lines, close anything you opened (whether that be braces, brackets, parenthesis, quotes, or files), comment tags and system ("pause"); are your friends, and make it easy for you to read.

There's nothing really ground breaking you need to know other then those things, which become second nature after a while of using them.

I wouldn't sugguest using system("pause"), as it's not portable :O. cin.get() is a better way to pause in the console.

Comments
Good ol' cin! =)

Eh that's not exactly what I meant. I'm going to write a specific question, please answer if you can, thanks.

Q. Is there a c++ dictionary of inputs I can use?

That is the only question I can think of because I'm so confused about how programming works.

(Note: I can follow along with lessons in books but I never learn anything that I can use to work on my own projects.

There is a Standard Library of predefined classes if that's what you're asking for.

If you're asking for different ways of doing something, you're better off searching MSDN or simply experimenting and finding out the hard way.

http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/table_of_contents.html (I'm sure you know about this)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3bstk3k5.aspx (Another kind of reference to C++, with some Microsoft-specific implementations )

http://www.cprogramming.com/reference/ (syntax reference)


As for learning something to use for your own projects, you might be better off studying C++ and then reading a dictionary to understand the terms of things in a human-readable way. Then it might be easier to create programs that are easy to understand and relate to.

There is a Standard Library of predefined classes if that's what you're asking for.

If you're asking for different ways of doing something, you're better off searching MSDN or simply experimenting and finding out the hard way.

http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl/table_of_contents.html (I'm sure you know about this)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3bstk3k5.aspx (Another kind of reference to C++, with some Microsoft-specific implementations )

http://www.cprogramming.com/reference/ (syntax reference)


As for learning something to use for your own projects, you might be better off studying C++ and then reading a dictionary to understand the terms of things in a human-readable way. Then it might be easier to create programs that are easy to understand and relate to.

Yes this helps, thanks.

If you are really determined to learn it on your own, start with little projects. In fact, if you go to one of the stickied threads above, there are a bunch of problems for beginners that you can try to work on. And whenever you have problems, try to figure it out on your own. This is what tremendously helps me learn how to code. You search for answers and in the process you learn more and more about everything, syntax, logic, how memory are allocated, etc.

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