I need to create a Space Invaders kind of game and I have a demo I need to copy the main features from. The invaders have to be of at least 3 different types and they change color.

So I figured the invaders are 3 child classes from a parent 'Invader' class that will have the methods of painting, moving, etc. What would be the best way to control the destruction of the invaders? I've read on this forum that a 'linked list' would be a way of doing just that. I don't know what a linked list is. So should I create an array that will store the position of the bullets (with a maximum of maybe 40 bullets). Is there a way to dynamically allocate memory for the bullets' position as they are created so I don't have an array of say 100 and use only 40?

The game will have sounds and the demo we've been given uses sound files located in the same folder the .exe is in, so they're not embedded (if that's how you would call it) or anything of that sort. The .exe is also got an icon.

We've been using PaintBox to draw stuff on application forms in Borland Builder so I think that's how it will be this time around too.

If you wish I can attach the demo folder.

Thanks in advance

1. DYNAMIC : Nop...must be constant...
2. ICON : try to use Windows API, or embeded it to your resource

OK, we love to see you code...

Sorry for my bad English :)

How can I move a form by dragging a label or a panel?
I've made the form borderless but as expected it can't be moved by mouse dragging. I know there is a way but I can't figure out how to move it by dragging the panel/label I'm using as the title bar, I don't know what properties to look at to perform this action and I haven't been able to find something useful on the net.
I'm using Borland Builder C++.

I solved the dragging problem.
Now I need to know how to change the cursor of the mouse while it's inside the client area of my application. I've looked around but haven't been able to find something I can use.

The Standard Template Library has a dynamically sizable array type, a linked list type, and generally a whole bunch of useful stuff that makes this easy, called the STL. The problem with STL is that it can be a bit confusing to people familiar with only C or new to C++, but since you are already talking inheritance, it's C++. The *other* issue with STL is that it is written pretty densely, and errors can be huge and hard to deal with, but I would suggest you look into it for what you are planning.

Thanx...
Sean

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