I need someone who can tell me where can I get proposed Java project for online practice. Please..I read many theory books and now I want to learn practicing. Thank you!

You say you have read a lot of theory, why then don't you consider practicing what you learnt in theory. Say for example try the Abstract Classes, Interfaces, Classes, Inner Classes, Exceptions, Threading etc in examples that you might have read in theory. This way you would also be asserting the knowledge gained from theory.

I need someone who can tell me where can I get proposed Java project for online practice.

in your own imagination. if you want to write an mp3-player, write it, if you're thinking about voice recognition or voice over IP, write it. if you want to write "RISK" in java, just do it.

there are millions of possibilities, if you can't find a single one, maybe you should question yourself whether this is the right course for you?

Thanks guys. Yes you are right but I want to be motivated also, for instance if I see a proposed Java project, and moreover, they pay you for it then it feels good.

@tavy88 :
You say you have to start practicing java. On the other hand you say "it would be good if someone pays you for that". Tell us why would anybody want to pay someone for giving him/her practice. Also projects that someone might pay you for, would be complex enough to implement, they would need to be stable, robust, efficient at what they do, how do you think a beginner is going to achieve that ?

EDIT : Also, is the joy of learning something new and constantly trying to better yourself at that not motivation enough, to keep you going ?

Can you also recommend a beginner 's course for JAVA EE, because I'm new in Servlets world and the entire web mechanism?

@tavy88 :
You say you have start practicing java. On the other hand you say "it would be good if someone pays you for that". Tell us why would anybody want to pay someone for giving him/her practice. Also projects that someone might pay you for, would be complex enough to implement, they would need to be stable, robust, efficient at what they do, how do you think a beginner is going to achieve that ?

I was just giving an example man. I know . The thing is I want to practice on complicated problems so I can learn new things, and I want to be motivated. Because if I sit here and think, hmmm let's implement Gray Code...I don't feel like doing it. I want to practice on something that the IT jobs are interested in, not on didactic problems, if you know what I mean....

You can find Java EE and Servlet tutorials on the Sun site. For the web mechanism, I do not know what you mean by that term, but if you are meaning the way Servlet's & JSP work, you can find it in the tutorials itself. If not google it and find.

I was just giving an example man. I know . The thing is I want to practice on complicated problems so I can learn new things, and I want to be motivated. Because if I sit here and think, hmmm let's implement Gray Code...I don't feel like doing it. I want to practice on something that the IT jobs are interested in, not on didactic problems, if you know what I mean....

The concepts that I mentioned in the posts are generic enough for any or every program to need them. Most IT organisations would be interested in knowing how much of the language fundamentals you know, domain knowledge is what every organisation has to provide to their new employees. No practicing is going to go waste. The more you practice the more closely are you going to get yourself acquainted with the language and the more comfortable you would be handling questions when you go for an interview. Once you know you have a stronghold over the basic things you can leap towards doing more serious work such as organisational projects.
And if you don't feel motivated enough to do practice programs, I suggest you look for a new domain, cuase if you are going to become a pro programmer that's what what you are going to do pretty much through out your life.

The concepts that I mentioned in the posts are generic enough for any or every program to need them. Most IT organisations would be interested in knowing how much of the language fundamentals you know, domain knowledge is what every organisation has to provide to their new employees. No practicing is going to go waste. The more you practice the more closely are you going to get yourself acquainted with the language and the more comfortable you would be handling questions when you go for an interview. Once you know you have a stronghold over the basic things you can leap towards doing more serious work such as organisational projects.
And if you don't feel motivated enough to do practice programs, I suggest you look for a new domain, cuase if you are going to become a pro programmer that's what what you are going to do pretty much through out your life.

Ok..I understand what you mean, but let's put it this way. If I were to apply for a Java Programming Post, what would their expectation be? Because I have no experience in a real IT job; All I have done until now was to write source codes for college projects, and labs...and they are school oriented let's say...but what do I do in the "real world" of IT as a Java programmer let's say, 'cause I'm sure they won't put me to solve the Hanoi Towers ,or Fibonacci's problems...that is what I meant. It would be perfect if a Java programmer ,who worked or is still working in this field, could give me some hints...what exactly should I be focusing on while studying Java... I think I made myself clear this time:)..Thank you in advance:D

They will start you with the most entry-level tasks they can find. That may be fixing a few simple bugs in certain packages, adding a trivial feature to an existing code section, or anything else that lets you get acquainted with the code base and style with minimal interference to ongoing work of the team. You're right that it won't have anything to do with Fibonacci numbers, but it will completely depend on the current work that the team is doing and how they decide to work you in to deal with the learning curve - which will be fairly steep in your first "real" job.

They will start you with the most entry-level tasks they can find. That may be fixing a few simple bugs in certain packages, adding a trivial feature to an existing code section, or anything else that lets you get acquainted with the code base and style with minimal interference to ongoing work of the team. You're right that it won't have anything to do with Fibonacci numbers, but it will completely depend on the current work that the team is doing and how they decide to work you in to deal with the learning curve - which will be fairly steep in your first "real" job.

Thanks man it really helped! Maybe you could train me a little bit, by giving me tasks:D...I would really like that..

Check out topcoder. They have competitions (good for the motivation thing) in three different difficulty levels. The competitions are for designing algorithms and it can be very challenging. You can program in Java, among other languages.

Thanks man it really helped! Maybe you could train me a little bit, by giving me tasks:D...I would really like that..

I am not understanding this approach of almost begging for help. You have only been asking for training/help/guidance in all of your posts. If you want to train yourself, you would be the best person ever to start giving yourself ideas since you are the one who knows best what you have been studying in the past, whats your grasping speed is like etc etc., You have been given enough pointers on where to start by many here - including myself - but you don't seem to be taking anything from that. You have been asking for help from your first post till the last one and nothing seems to have changed, not even the tone.

if for you motivation equals a paycheck, I would recommend you to go into a different direction.

PS : I agree with Stultuske entirely, even I mentioned this before to you but he does it more concisely.

Check out topcoder. They have competitions (good for the motivation thing) in three different difficulty levels. The competitions are for designing algorithms and it can be very challenging. You can program in Java, among other languages.

Thanks man it really helps me!

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