i have developed a c# project now i have to make it an Exe so that i can install it on any system and run it...

the bin which contains the exe only runs in the system which has .net installed and does not executes where there is no .net....

as this is my first project can any one tell me how to make my application an exe file so tat it can be installed and executed on any system..

i have developed a c# project now i have to make it an Exe so that i can install it on any system and run it...

the bin which contains the exe only runs in the system which has .net installed and does not executes where there is no .net....

as this is my first project can any one tell me how to make my application an exe file so tat it can be installed and executed on any system..

Application deployment is not an issue with .NET. Windows Xp, Vista Operating systems already have .NET Framework. If installed version of .NET framework are not suitable then you have to install a new one.

The easiest method to deploy an application is to copy+paste Bin folder anywhere.

Comments
wrong information and bad recommendation.

Application deployment is not an issue with .NET. Windows Xp, Vista Operating systems already have .NET Framework. If installed version of .NET framework are not suitable then you have to install a new one.

The easiest method to deploy an application is to copy+paste Bin folder anywhere.

No, that is not true. Deployment is an issue. If the .NET framework is not installed then you have a deployment issue, which is probably why the thread was started here. XP does not come pre-installed with the .NET ... XP was released late in 2001, and the .NET framework was released in 2002. How does an OS come pre-installed with software released after it was?

The easiest, recommended, and proper method for deployment is by following serkan's advice and creating a deployment project.

Yes, Sknake it's important issue if your client uses Windows XP or not. Adatapost you show a lot of bad recommendations, please when you're sure answer!

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.