Greetings,

Just a really quick and somewhat simple question with a (hopefully...) simple answer:

Is J#.NET the same thing as Java?

If not, what are the differences between J# and Java.

Thanks in advance,

DeFrog777

basically, they're different. Java is made by SUN, and J# is made by SUN's rival company Microsoft. Java is better :)

Thanks for the clairification! I greatly appreciate it! And I agree with C++ that Sun's Java is easier and more user-friendly than Microsoft's J#. And with what I've been reading, Java is gaining popularity throughout the developer community, even going so far as to replace C++ on the AP Programming exam. Is Java the proverbial wave of the future in development? Only time will tell, and that is a topic for another time(and thread :) )

Thanks again,

DeFrog777

Both java and anything in the .NET framework is very hot right now. I personally think they are the wave of the future, and any employer will be looking for people qualified in these areas.

Hi everyone,

Is Java the proverbial wave of the future in development? Only time will tell, and that is a topic for another time

Here is a link

http://www.daniweb.com/techtalkforums/thread8386.html

The thread is now closed as instead of discussing the topic at hand certain members started launching personal attacks against one another.

It's quite entertaining to read.

Maybe the flame can still be rekindled

If you ask me .net is a ripoff of java. I used to remember people from microsoft used to say that java was useless and that C++ was better as you did not need such a large sdk or runtime. Guess who has the largest sdk and runtime now??

ps: i do not hate microsoft

Richard West

.NET is not a ripoff of Java just as Java is not a ripoff of C++.
.NET is a logical progression from the existing COM+ technology which itself is a development of older ActiveX technology the predecessors of which existed over 10 years ago.

Java didn't invent the concept of a virtual machine, nor did it invent garbage collection. Both had been in existence in other products for a long time.
What Java did was popularise these technologies.

Java isn't the wave of the future, it's the wave of today.
What the future will bring is unknown, most likely it will be Cobol though.

.NET is not a ripoff of Java just as Java is not a ripoff of C++.
.NET is a logical progression from the existing COM+ technology which itself is a development of older ActiveX technology the predecessors of which existed over 10 years ago.

Java didn't invent the concept of a virtual machine, nor did it invent garbage collection. Both had been in existence in other products for a long time.
What Java did was popularise these technologies.

Java isn't the wave of the future, it's the wave of today.
What the future will bring is unknown, most likely it will be Cobol though.

Hmm, very interesting. Indeed .NET and Java are very similar in many respects, but they do have several differences.

For instance even though it is a very powerful development tool. Visual Studio .NET is VERY expensive. Truth be told that you can find comperable if not better tools either free or at a fraction of the cost of Visual Studio .NET but Visual Studio is definately the standard.

Now lets compare Java to .NET. Java is a very powerful development tool at little to no cost to the end user and is catching on quite quickly. I have even heard that Java has replaced C++ on the AP Programming test. My personal opinion is that neither one will replace the other, but instead will achieve a "peaceful" coexistance.

Now the "wave of the future" is Cobol? I am probably not the one to say, but I don't think so. Of course my opinion is biased because I have never written a single line of code in Cobol, but if you can prove me wrong, I would love to hear reasons why.

Just putting in my two cents...
DeFrog777

That last was a jab at all the people who always say "Java is dead", "C++ is dead", "<name your language> is dead" :)

Cobol has been around for about 40 years now, and is still in largescale use today. I'd not be surprised at all if Cobol is still around when both Java and .NET are dead and forgotten.
Whereas both Java and .NET are used to create flashy internet and desktop applications (which typically have a short shelf life, they get replaced within a few years at most usually), Cobol runs the mainframes and supercomputers. Those applications are built to last, and run (with maintenance and upgrades for new and changed functionality) for decades almost uninterrupted.
They run so well in fact that there's no reason to shoulder the extreme cost of replacing them with something "more modern" (usually meaning Java or C++).

I was involved in one such massive Cobol project. The software had originally been created by another company some decade before we purchased it in 1992 (that was before I came on board). Last I heard (2003) it was still in active use and still being developed. That's 20 years for a single application, running on the same hardware all the time (ok, with upgrades to the hardware, adding harddisks and CPUs of course).

We were asked at one point by the customer to calculate the cost (in time and money) to replace the application with one created in C++.
We estimated it would take about 2 years and 60 million dollars to write and test the replacement application to fully replace the existing one. During that period maintenance and development (to enable new products and services for the customer that they were constantly adding) would require another 30 million.
They decided to increase our project budget from 15 million a year to 20 million instead so we would have money to train people to program Cobol ourselves (as they are getting hard to find on the open market).

I have even heard that Java has replaced C++ on the AP Programming test.

It has, but that doesn't mean java is replacing C++. I personally think java is the best language around to teach OO concepts, and is very user friendly. I guess I could base that on fact since all Uni's and HS' are teaching it jetzt, and there has to be a reason for that.

Wow, when I said I'd like to hear why Cobol would be (or as you say "is") the wave of the future, I had no idea what I was getting myself into! :) I guess I'll have to reconsider the Cobol languange. I was dead wrong in saying that Cobol was not the wave of the future!

But as you say, Cobol is a very stable and sturdy platform for supercomputers and mainframes, and this is the wave of the future. Perhaps I should look into this language that is being cast in the shadow of C++, .NET, and Java...

Thanks for the insight!

DeFrog777

COBOL deals very well with the business of business -- char fields and numbers. It does decimal arithmetic. It protects programmers and the system from the misuses of pointers. It is easy to write and easy to read.

There are many dialects of COBOL and many OS environments and platforms in which it is used. I am familiar with Wang VS COBOL 74 and COBOL 85, which run in the Wang VS OS environment and make use of the Wang VS Integrated Editor. Source code editing, compiling and linking are generally done from within the Editor. The Wang VS also has an excellent interactive debugger which anticipated by many years the features now common in interactive debuggers.

The VS environment provides 17-way indexed files and rollback/rollforward recoverable file functionality at the OS level. No third party file systems, add-ins or plugins are needed.

The VS is a mainframe patterned closely after the IBM 360/370 but with an OS built to support interactivity from the ground up. The machine language closely matches the requirements of COBOL, with decimal arithmetic, packed decimal arithmetic, binary arithmetic and bulletproof string (field) operations. You can overrun an array if you're not prudent in your management of subscript values, but you can't overrun a field.

The Wang VS also now has a new hardware platform, finally freeing it from the legacy hardware of its 30-year lifetime and about a dozen generations of proprietary hardware since 1977. It now runs seamlessly on selected x86 servers, under Linux. "Seamlessly" means that the new platform runs the standard VS OS, all the utilities, all the dozen or so languages, and all the existing applications. The new platform is loaded from standard VS backup tapes. There is zero program or data conversion. Performance is up to twice that of the fastest legacy Wang VS ever made (ca. 1999).

Comments
Unrelated to Java and post is over 2 years old.

You dug up this 2 year old post in the Java forum just to promote your mainframe and COBOL?

<boggle>

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.