i came across two high level programming languages :python and ruby.
they are cross platform,just like java. they are very productive ( a programmer can write a program using python in less than quarter the time you need to write the same program in java). they have have -more or less- all the features you need to make your life easy.

my question is : why then should me ,you and everybody sacrifice productivity and go for java instead ? what does java has that make it more favorable?

Who says you can produce it in a quarter of the time?

And "more or less" can be a much larger discrepancy than you are attempting to make it sound.

And, AFAIK, neither of those languages have the strong-typing, nor security that Java does. Which, even if you could produce things "in a quarter of time", you'd could very likely be shooting yourself in the foot four times faster.

Who says you can produce it in a quarter of the time?

people who knows both java and python do say so. you just have to google it.

And, AFAIK, neither of those languages have the strong-typing, nor security that Java does.

python got strong typing ,but not security

people who knows both java and python do say so. you just have to google it.

Qualified, trustworthy sources, please. You're the one making the argument here.

python got strong typing ,but not security

I know that it has very strict "indention" rules to enforce the block definitions, but, AFAIK (correct me if I am wrong), it still has an "eval" statement, which, IMHO, is far from "strongly-typed".

> python got strong typing ,but not security

I guess 'masijade' meant that Python is not statically typed like Java and hence you lose out on aggressive re-factoring and excellent IDE support.

JAVA is fast in executing the project and Python is fast in developing the project. which do you choose?

> python got strong typing ,but not security

I guess 'masijade' meant that Python is not statically typed like Java and hence you lose out on aggressive re-factoring and excellent IDE support.

Ahh, that's the word I was searching for. ;-)

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