1. With VB5 you can either create an EXE file while you are running VB, or use the separate setupwiz utility to create a .EXE file. The setupwiz way results in a smaller EXE file. Is this the only advantage? Also the setupwiz way results in the program doing something with the registry when your client installs the program. What is this all about?

2. When a program is put on the servers hard disk and then run from a shortcut from another terminal I'm a bit unsure of exactly what happens. Is the program loaded into the terminals RAM, or the Server's RAM? It seems the default place the program put's the files is on the server's hard disk (which is fine). Does this mean the program is in the servers RAM?

Cheers.

1. With VB5 you can either create an EXE file while you are running VB, or use the separate setupwiz utility to create a .EXE file. The setupwiz way results in a smaller EXE file. Is this the only advantage? Also the setupwiz way results in the program doing something with the registry when your client installs the program. What is this all about?

2. When a program is put on the servers hard disk and then run from a shortcut from another terminal I'm a bit unsure of exactly what happens. Is the program loaded into the terminals RAM, or the Server's RAM? It seems the default place the program put's the files is on the server's hard disk (which is fine). Does this mean the program is in the servers RAM?

Cheers.

Well, creating an EXE with the setupwiz actually goes through to make an entire setup program. With the cute blue screen and the next next next finish buttons. Creating an EXE from within the VB IDE, just makes the EXE, with no dependency files or anything else. Why the EXE is smaller the other way is something I have absolutely no idea how to answer, but I know one is made for installation purposes and one is made for just compiling an EXE.

As for running programs from the server, I'm fairly confident in my resolve to say that the exe gets loaded into the clients (terminal's) ram, and NOT the server. I mean, sure, the server probably has to use a little bit of ram to transfer the EXE to the terminal or something, but I'm pretty sure that the ram occupied is on the terminal.

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