Hi all, the search function failed to yield any results for me so I come here to create a new thread. I'm learning C++ on my own (sort of a weird hobby of mine to learn code, don't ask) and had an interesting question...

Consider the following:

Ingredients.h

#ifndef RECIPE_H
#define RECIPE_H

class Recipe
{
};

#endif

and...
Recipe Manager.cpp

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include "Recipe.h"

int main()
{
}

inside of my main function in "Recipe Manager.cpp" would I somehow be able to accept a std::cin to create a new object of my Recipe class? For instance, would something like the following work:

string title = "";
std::cin >> title;
Recipe title;

I get that in line #3 above, a new object of Recipe will be instantiated with the name of "title", but what I'm looking for is a way for std::cin to create a new object of Recipe with the name of what the user types... is this possible?

Some background on me: pretty good at Java, learning C++ through "www.learncpp.com" currently at mid-chapter 8. Not in school yet, so you don't have to worry about me cheating on homework...

All help is appreciated, thank you.

No, this is not possible and even not meaningful. Why would you want a program user to specify the name of a variable?
If you want to give a name to your "Recipe", all you need is to give it an attribute (i.e. a member variable) which you can set when creating a new object (Recipe). You could do this by initializing it in the constructor.

#ifndef RECIPE_H
#define RECIPE_H
class Recipe
{
public:
  Recipe(const string t) : sTitle(t) {};
private:
  string sTitle;
};
#endif

and than in your main function you could do:

string title = "";

std::cin >> title;

Recipe someCake(title);

Now you have a Recipe with a title.

Best regards

No, this is not possible and even not meaningful. Why would you want a program user to specify the name of a variable?
If you want to give a name to your "Recipe", all you need is to give it an attribute (i.e. a member variable) which you can set when creating a new object (Recipe). You could do this by initializing it in the constructor.

#ifndef RECIPE_H
#define RECIPE_H
class Recipe
{
public:
  Recipe(const string t) : sTitle(t) {};
private:
  string sTitle;
};
#endif

and than in your main function you could do:

string title = "";

std::cin >> title;

Recipe someCake(title);

Now you have a Recipe with a title.

Best regards

Thanks a ton, it always helps to have another mindset with this stuff. I'll play around with what you suggested and try to see if I can get that to work for me. Thanks for the help.

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