i am a student of software. i need some help regarding this. am just a beginner so plz help me out....

yar dekho simple hai aik example deta hn agar samajh aa jae to theek hai nai to mere pass aa k sekh lena


#include<iostream.h>
#include<conio.h>
main()
{
cout<<"ram disk"<<endl;
getch();
return 0;
}

samajh na aye to is number pe call kar lena [snipped]
ya FUIEMS NEW lalazar aa k sekh lena
source
[snipped]

Edited 5 Years Ago by Ezzaral: Snipped phone and fake sig link.

I'll just ignore the post above.

What do you mean "create a RAM disk"? (RAM isn't a disk...; it stands for Random Access Memory)

hey its too easy look at the eaxample if u didnt get it then come to me i will teach u

#include<iostream.h>
#include<conio.h>
main()
{
cout<<"ram disk"<<endl;
getch();
return 0;
}

if u didnt understand call me at [snipped]
otherwise come FUIEMS UNIVERSITY NEW lalazar i will teach u
[snipped]

Edited 5 Years Ago by Ezzaral: Added code tags, snipped contact info. Keep it on site.

@ venomxxl
man RAM disk is wat we call....Random Access Memory is its abbreviation.
if u can help me in making aa RAM program then plz .....

@abbass.
ur program got an error.... u r returning 0 nd didnt mention int

Basically, every program you compile is "a RAM program" because every program resides in the (virtual) memory.

Edited 5 Years Ago by venomxxl: n/a

@venomxxl. buddy i know that...
actualy my teacher said me to find a program of C/C++ in which you make a virtual RAM.
so now i guess you got it

You are using some confusing terminology. If you want to treat memory as if it was a disk, you might want to look into tmpfs or something like that. Or you could attempt to create your own fs "format". Are you supposed to write a driver? This seems like a hard project for "a beginner" like you stated before. Maybe you have misinterpreted what your teacher said.

@venomxxl.....hmmmm i gueesss...but its not any project..he said to get screenshot of such program.

Maybe Knoppix would be a good example. It is a Linux distro. Looks like this thread doesn't belong to C section after all.

You are using some confusing terminology. If you want to treat memory as if it was a disk, you might want to look into tmpfs or something like that. Or you could attempt to create your own fs "format". Are you supposed to write a driver? This seems like a hard project for "a beginner" like you stated before. Maybe you have misinterpreted what your teacher said.

You don't know what a RAM disk is obviously. ;)

A RAM disk is memory that is set up to emulate a hard drive. The system will recognize it as a drive, separate from your other memory, and you access it the same way as a drive.

It holds files, has sectors, etc.

A RAM disk has a few distinct advantages:

1) If your info is VERY sensitive, the instant the machine shuts down, the data is gone, and can't be recovered - quite a bit more secure than any normal hard drive.

2) Access times to the RAM disk is VERY fast - it is memory, after all, and has no mechanical parts that have to be moved. (read/write head, spinning platters)

In a recent project of mine, the program generated millions of files, every day. Each 1,000 file group of files, had to be quickly checked, and then could be over-written. So I used a RAM disk, just to speed things up, (the project took months to complete), and to save the wear and tear on my physical hard drive.

They are a thing of beauty, but you don't want to use them if you have a wonky power grid in your area!

Finally someone had enough smarts to know what a RAM disk is. I suspect only us older people have ever heard of it because its only supported on 16-bit MS-DOS operating system, which used randrive.sys file at boot time. AFAIK they can not be created in 32 or 64-bit os. You might want to read some of these google links for more information.

[edit]Looks like there is a way to do it, but you will have to experiment with it yourself. As for writing the code yourself, good luck because it may involve a large amount of assembly language and kernel level programming.

Edited 5 Years Ago by Ancient Dragon: n/a

I ran them on Windows 7 and Windows XP OS's, but you do have to hunt around for them, and not all of them worked.

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