Tuples are immutable objects, they cannot be changed says the Python manual.

my_tuple = (1, 2, 3, [4, 5, 6])

# this works
my_tuple[3][2] = 7

# clearly the item at index 3 in the tuple has changed
print(my_tuple)     # (1, 2, 3, [4, 5, 7])

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Lists are passed by reference, so the tuple contains the memory address of the list, not the list itself, and that doesn't change. Both of these statements will fail

my_tuple = (1, 2, 3, [4, 5, 6])

new_list = [4, 5, 6]
my_tuple[3] = new_list     ## new …
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Think about the words though. Did you change the tuple? Or did you change the item at index of?

Lists are passed by reference, so the tuple contains the memory address of the list, not the list itself, and that doesn't change. Both of these statements will fail

my_tuple = (1, 2, 3, [4, 5, 6])

new_list = [4, 5, 6]
my_tuple[3] = new_list     ## new memory address
my_tuple[1] = "a"

You are changing list, not tuple

>>> my_tuple
(1, 2, 3, [4, 5, 6])
>>> type(my_tuple[3])
<class 'list'>
>>> id(my_tuple[3])
14727328
>>> my_tuple[3][2]=7
>>> id(my_tuple[3])
14727328

Well, you are on to something, the tuple has changed. However, the id() of the whole tuple is still the same after the change.

My advice, don't rely blindly on tuples not changing as advertised.

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