I know C++ well and have written some programs in it but when I look at a program's code,I can't understand it.I wanna know is there a place where I can learn to write real world programs?Sth like a C++ certification?
thanks

Edited 5 Years Ago by pywriter: n/a

Don't worry -- everyone has that problem from time-to-time. It frequently takes a lot of time and studying to figure out how another programmer wrote a program. Been there, and done that.

Well that's just one problem.I think I didn't make myself clear.
My main problem is that all programs I've written till now,are just student home works.very trivial.Like finding prime numbers between two given numbers.
I want to write sth that can be used some where.Well,in fact,I want to start learning to write such programs.But I don't know how.

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Adter periods and commas there is ALWAYS a Space. Please write properly to help us understand

Start reading code in open source projects, chose your area of interest, download a project of that interest and start installing,reading,modifying code and see the result. Best way to learn lot of things all together.

The world of programming is vast. Really, really vast. "Real world" programming is just too vague a term. What do you think of when you say that? What do you mean? Do you mean GUIs? Embedded code? Operating Systems? Number-crunching algorithms? Code for websites? Databases? There's a lot more, and it's all done for the "real world".

I suggest you pick whichever piques your interest, and work on that.

When you get a first entry-level programming job you will most likely not be writing all new code yourself, but instead you will be modifying and debugging existing code (program maintenance). The only new code you might write is to make product enhancements to existing products. No one is going to sit you down at a computer and expect you to write an entirely new program all by yourself.

I know C++ well and have written some programs in it but when I look at a program's code,I can't understand it.

There's a difference between knowing C++ and knowing how to program in C++. "Real world" programming involves more than just the language. There needs to be an understanding of the problem domain, the target environment as well as APIs and libraries used.

Real world code works around limitations and often isn't elegant. Real world code (hopefully) strives to be robust, so you'll encounter a great deal more error handling and reporting than in toy exercises.

I wanna know is there a place where I can learn to write real world programs

The only way to learn how to write real world programs is by reading and writing real world programs. Practice makes perfect, and we were all where you are right now. However, you have the enviable position of having so many open source projects (real world programs) to study. Those of us who started programming before that particular boom hit its stride had to figure things out through trial and error.

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I still learn through trial and error, I find it much more efficient to learn the "Hard Way". Although I sometimes need DW to get me back on my feet.

When you get a first entry-level programming job you will most likely not be writing all new code yourself, but instead you will be modifying and debugging existing code (program maintenance). The only new code you might write is to make product enhancements to existing products. No one is going to sit you down at a computer and expect you to write an entirely new program all by yourself.

Looks like my job should be paying me more, because I had to and still am writing the same application from scratch. Sometimes, I feel used. The entry level dude next to me, is maintaining code and adding a little features like you said. I guess I'll stay an intern for a while If I want to continue coding.

You mean interns actually get paid in $$$??? I thought all you got was college credit for your work.

Edited 5 Years Ago by Ancient Dragon: n/a

You mean interns actually get paid in $$$??? I thought all you got was college credit for your work.

Yea there is a variety of internships. Some do not compensate, others compensate through college credits, and some actually pay money. Actually, there is more that pays money than not, at least when I searched for it.

It's illegal here to have unpaid interns doing anything at all useful to the business.

What makes you think interns do anything useful :) college credit should IMO be considered pay.

What makes you think interns do anything useful :) college credit should IMO be considered pay.

:( I wouldn't want to work for you then lol

What makes you think interns do anything useful :) college credit should IMO be considered pay.

What if you're not at college? If this is some kind of work-experience gig?

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