I am taking a step backwards in to C from C#. I am studying C# at University but feel I may be rather restricted as to what I can do later on. For that reason I would like to learn C (also to get a good idea about the real low level stuff)

Any ideas or comments on this decision?
Thanks

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Step backwards? You mean to say C# is better than C? How so?

If you feel C will be less restrictive than C#, sounds like a step forward to me.

I agree with your decision - it seems like a good one to me.

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Step backwards? You mean to say C# is better than C? How so?

If you feel C will be less restrictive than C#, sounds like a step forward to me.

I agree with your decision - it seems like a good one to me.

I am studying C# at University but feel I may be rather restricted as to what I can do later on.

Interesting. I haven't felt restricted with C#, and that's coming from a C and C++ background. Though a lot of people associate C# with .NET rather than the internationally standardized language that it is, which most certainly can be restrictive because .NET is limited to Windows platforms (Mono is an attempt to create a Linux-based implementation of .NET, which includes C#).

For that reason I would like to learn C

Sweet. :) I'm a strong advocate of learning C after you've got a practical language under your belt (unless C is your practical language).

Any ideas or comments on this decision?

I think it's a good decision, and the OO practices you've learned in C# will help with writing good C. But do remember that C is a completely different language from a different era, and the programming style is different as well. While good structured code will follow many principles of OOP, it won't follow all of them, and the ones it does follow will likely look different.

You'll probably get frustrated rather quickly due to the differences in programming style and lower level of C#, but don't get it stop you.

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