I'm looking for how to brute-force the result of something like "Hi".hashCode() .
I have no idea where to start.
I looked for the answer for like 5 hours yesterday.
It's for reversing Minecraft seeds. (seed-to-text).
I tried my own solution. It's too crap to even post.
I tried to find a MD5 brute-force cracker on Google, and modify it to use hashCode() . It went like "a", "b", "c" ... "y", "z", "a" when it should be like "a", "b", "c" ... "y", "z", "aa", "ab" . I really need some help.

And it has to be recursive. (So it will go infinity digits until it finds the answer). And should include special characters too.

This isn't an attempt to violate the DaniWeb rule that says
"Do not ask for help to pursue any illegal activity including, but not limited to, hacking..." is it?

Sorry, but I'm not sufficiently sure that reverse-engineering a hashcode isn't for some dubious purpose, so I'm staying out of this. I suspect my colleagues feel the same. Maybe you can explain more about why you are doing this to reassure us that it's 100% legitimate?

It's to convert a Minecraft seed (hashCode() of string given by user, then used in a random generator as seed)(something like -6007422400597289330) to a textual representation (something like zQV5GH@zN). That makes it (somewhat) easier to remember.

If the goal is to reversibly convert an arbitrary 20 digit number into a memorable alpha string then I think there are real limits to what can be done.
The alpha string must have a value space at least as big as the numeric form, so with about 70 symbols to play with (vs 10 for the numeric form) you will need an alpha string at least half the length of the numeric one.
If you create an array of 64 alpha chars you can take consecutive 6-bit chunks from the binary representation of your number and use those to index into the array. It equally easy to convert back.

But, i'm not in control of how the seed function of Minecraft works (sadly). Minecraft is a highly successful game mainly by Markus Persson and Jens Bergensten in Sweden, and it's not open-source. But Jens posted on a forum how the seeds work.

Umm, the goal for this is like an MD5 brute-force cracker, but with String.hashCode():

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