I have 3 tables in MSSQL 2008 (ABSTRACT)

tblContacts:
ContactID: Auto Numbering Int
FName: string
LName: string
Address1: string
Address2: String
City: string
State: string
Zip: string
ContactType: int


tblStaff:
ContactID: int
StaffID: AutoNumber Int
Title: string
Unit: string
(etc)


tblMembers:
ContactID int
ApplicationDate: string
Membership Date: date/time
City: string
StaffID: string
Unit: string
(etc)

Actually this represents an example that is greatly simplified. I have been looking to create a windows form that binds this data to textboxes and such. The master table is the tblContacts and detail is tblMembers:. The relationship is based on ContactID and each tblMembers has an associated record from the tblStaff which will needs to return the first name and last name of the staff person that is assigned to the member.

I need to use mostly all text boxes or comboxes and there are a lot of fields that have to go into the tblMembers table. I have been using tabs to segment the detail areas for the member information because of the amount of real estate that all of the fields that is taken up.

I can get the tblContacts fields to add a new record but any information that is added to the tblMembers table is lost. If I navigate to another record and come back the data is saved this time. I think that since there is no ContactID available to the tblMembers table it does not commit the changes until the tblContacts is upated. I have used a datagrid to see how information was stored and it works with a data grid. I presume that it is because the datagrid forces a commit to the tblContacts table when the event for entry in the datagid fires. I need a simple solution.

I have thought about populating arrays. In access you would just plop in a subform on the main form. That is not a solution as this is enterprise data and we need multi-user support that access doesn't work well.

I am not able to grab my source but I need some help. This is why I have presented this as an abstract.

Edited 5 Years Ago by ehrendreich: n/a

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