Hi!

I'm trying to read wstring from file.

This is an file content example:
"83
118
269
...
"
The number 83 represent "S", 118 represent "v", 269 represent "č", and so on..

So, I tried to read the numbers into int. But the problem is, that I don't know how to convert int to wstring, to get actual letter(convert: int value of 83 to letter "S").

tnx

If you perform the command
char c=83
you will get that c is equal to 'S'

edit: sorry didnt see the wstring :O only works on char

Edited 4 Years Ago by Despairy: 87-> 83 mistake

You will find the information in any ascii chart, such as this one. Since C/C++ and other languages represent letters are numbers there is no conversion from one to the other except for typecasting. If you want to display the letter 'S' all you do is typecast it to char, for example

int letter = 83;
cout << (char)letter;

Edited 4 Years Ago by Ancient Dragon

Ancient Dragon - is there a difference between the wstring and the char?
I saw somewhere that by using the boost library you can transform the number into its wstring
and if im not mistaken its more characters than the ascii table can provide ( like his 269 one )

thanks

yes I also need the c-caron, s-caron, ... letters. for example, number 269 will not work on char

you could copy the ints into wchar_t variables or std::wstring. What characters are displayed on the screen will depend on what language(s) are installed in the computer. For MS-Windows also look into setlocale()

Ancient Dragon - is there a difference between the wstring and the char?

Yes, wchar_t is 2 or more bytes per character while char is only 1 byte per character. std::wstring is an array of wchar_t characters. std::wstring and std::string are not easily convertable from one to the other. Furthermore, the size of wchar_t is not constant from one os to another. On MS-Windows sizeof(wchar_t) is 2 while on *nix it is 4. I read a couple years ago that UNICODE standards committee is considering expanding it to 8 so that it can hold graphics characters used in some languages.

Edited 4 Years Ago by Ancient Dragon

It works! tnx

solution:

wstring letters =L"";
int number=269;
letters += (wchar_t)number;
wcout<<letters;

Edited 4 Years Ago by mikesr

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