Helo friends!!
I m having problems in understanding that how every node is added at last.Could anyone explain me this in much better manner.
Well here it is....
we use a local "reference pointer" which always points to the last
pointer in the list instead of to the last node. All additions to the list are made by following the reference pointer. The reference pointer starts off pointing to the head pointer.
Later, it points to the .next field inside the last node in the list.:?:

struct node* BuildWithLocalRef()
 {
struct node* head = NULL;
struct node** lastPtrRef= &head; // Start out pointing to the head pointer
int i;
for (i=1; i<6; i++) {
Push(lastPtrRef, i); // Add node at the last pointer in the list
lastPtrRef= &((*lastPtrRef)->next); // Advance to point to the
// new last pointer
}
// head == {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
return(head);
}

>i'm having problems in understanding that how every node is added at last.

You do realise there are loads of examples regarding linked lists on the net. You only need to look to realise this.

>i'm having problems in understanding that how every node is added at last.

You do realise there are loads of examples regarding linked lists on the net. You only need to look to realise this.

what kind of reply was that...???
If you know the answer than post otherwise your suggestions are not invited.
Thanks

Post a small but complete snippet of code that demonstrates the issue. Pepper it with some debugging output to make things clear to us and you what it is you are trying to do.

You can make it easier for people to answer you know. Expecting folks to recreate what you have sitting in front of you is somewhat rude. And given the little play that this thread has gotten, I'd say your best bet would be to make it easier to answer.

A list is made up of zero to x nodes, where x is limited only by the amount of memory available. If there are nodes in the list then it has a first node and a last node. You have to keep track of the first, as it's the entry point for all other nodes in the list. You don't have to keep track of the last node, but you can if you wish.

Each node in a list is an instance of a struct/class and has one or more node pointers to (an)other node(s), frequently called next, previous, etc. In a singly linked list each node points to just one other node, except the last, which often will have a NULLed pointer. In a doubly linked list, each node points to two other nodes, the one before and the one after, except the first which has no before and the last which has no after.

Usually nodes themselves aren't used in manipulating lists. Rather pointers to nodes are used. So head is usually a pointer to the first node in the list, and tail is a pointer to the last node in the list. Often, in discussions about lists head is referred to as the first node, but it's really not, that's just convenient short hand. All nodes added to the list first need to be created somehow. This is often done using dynamic memory and assigning the address returned by the memory allocation routine to a node pointer, sometimes called newNode.

If there are no nodes in the list, then both head and tail are frequently assigned NULL.
If there is one node in the list, then head and tail contain the same address. If there is more than one node in a list, then the addresses in head and tail are different.

The list can be expanded by adding a new node anywhere within the list at your discretion. For example, if you keep track of tail, and you want to expand the list beyond one node by always adding at the end of the list just assign newNode to the pointer in tail and then assign the pointer in tail to tail, so that in essence newNode becomes the new tail. Then if you want you can assign NULL to newNode and wait for the next new node to be declared.

In effect what happens is that each pointer to node within a given node contains either the address of the next node in the list, if there is one, or, in the case of the last node where the pointer in the node is usually assigned NULL, though I've seen implentations where the last node points to itself instead of being NULL.

Simple as that.

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.