0

@Gribouillis hi and thanks for the improvement , originally that is what I had in mind but I tried and tried but could not get the rest of the code working ( your while true part line 20 and after , but my version) until I got headache looking at the monitor that is why I cut my code short and uploaded the short version . I will look at your code again once my headache is gone . thanks again

0

Pygame can do it ...

import pygame as pg

pg.init()
yellow = (255, 255, 0)
screen = pg.display.set_mode((640, 280))
# pick a font you have and set its size
myfont = pg.font.SysFont("Courier", 60)
label = myfont.render("Hello World", 1, yellow)
screen.blit(label, (100, 100))
pg.display.flip()

# event loop used for exit
while True:
    for event in pg.event.get():
        # exit conditions --> windows titlebar x click
        if event.type == pg.QUIT:
            pg.quit()
            raise SystemExit
0

I thought it might be interesting to show a typical Hello World program in several popular languages, adding a for loop to the fray. Since the C based languages have a main() entrypoint, I added a main() function to the Python code too.

Here is the Python code ...

# py_hello_world_loop.py

def main():
    for k in range(10):
        print("Hello World")

main()

Followed by the C# (Csharp) code ...

// cs_hello_world_loop.cs

using System;

class Hello
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        for (int k = 0; k < 10; k++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello World");
        }

    }
}

Now the mighty C++ code ...

// cpp_hello_world_loop.cpp

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

  for(int k = 0; k < 10; k++)
    cout << "Hello World" << endl;

}

One of the classic languages C ...

// c_hello_world_loop.c

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
   int k;

   for(k = 0; k < 10; k++)
      puts("Hello World\n");

   return 0;
}

Now a relatively new language, Google's Go language ...

// go_hello_world_loop.go

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {

    for k := 0; k < 10; k++ {
        fmt.Println("Hello World")
    }

}
0

From a dictionary ...

# makes Python3 print() work with Python2
#from __future__ import print_function

d = {0: 'H', 1: 'e', 2: 'l',
3: 'l', 4: 'o', 5: ' ', 6: 'W',
7: 'o', 8: 'r', 9: 'l', 10: 'd'}

for n in range(11):
    print(d[n], end="")

Create the dictionary this way ...
d = dict(enumerate("Hello World"))

0

From a generator ...

def hello_g():
    yield 'Hello'
    yield 'World'

g = hello_g()
print("{} {}".format(next(g), next(g)))
0

From a decorator ...

def hello(func):
    def inner():
        print("Hello World")
        return func
    return inner

@hello
def my_func():
    pass

my_func()
0

Extract from sentences ...

s1 = "He eats large lunches often."
s2 = "We omit repeating last dates."
s3 = "".join(w[0] for w in s1.split())
s4 = "".join(w[0] for w in s2.split())
print("{} {}".format(s3, s4))
3

Vegaseat:
Bit more interesting content decorator:

def print_it(func):
    def inner(*args):
        print(' '.join(func()))
        return func
    return inner

@print_it
def my_func():
    return "Hello", "World"

my_func()

Edited by pyTony

0

Why not?

import textwrap

s = "Hello World " * 5
print(s)
print(textwrap.fill(s, 12))
print(s)
0

We don't use rjust() too often ...

s = "Hello World:" * 10
n = 10
for w in s.split(':'):
    print(w.rjust(n))
    n += 5
1

Module kivy ( http://kivy.org/#home ) anyone?

from kivy.app import App
from kivy.uix.scatter import Scatter
from kivy.uix.label import Label
from kivy.uix.floatlayout import FloatLayout

class TestApp(App):
    def build(self):
        s1 = "drag me with the left mouse button "
        s2 = "or your finger on a touch screen"
        App.title = s1 + s2
        # this will be the root widget to return
        flo = FloatLayout()
        # allows dragging
        scatter = Scatter()
        s = "Hello World"
        label = Label(text=s, font_size=150)

        flo.add_widget(scatter)
        scatter.add_widget(label)
        return flo

TestApp().run()

Edited by vegaseat

0

Let's revisit the generator ...

# makes Python3 print() work with Python2
from __future__ import print_function

# use a generator
def hello_gen():
    for c in "Hello World":
        yield c

g = hello_gen()

while True:
    try:
        print(next(g), end='')
    except StopIteration:
        print('')
        break

# a for loop takes care of StopIteration
for c in hello_gen():
    print(c, end='')
print('')

A little overkill in this case, but it shows the workings of a generator.

Edited by vegaseat: for

2

You can of course use a generator expression to create a generator ...

gen = (c for c in "Hello World")

while True:
    try:
        print(next(gen), end='')
    except StopIteration:
        print('')
        break
1

Using module base64 ...

import base64
encoded = "SGVsbG8gV29ybGQ="
try:
    # Python2
    decoded = base64.decodestring(encoded)
except TypeError:
    # Python3
    decoded = base64.decodestring(encoded.encode("utf8")).decode("utf8")
print(decoded)
1

Making hello world movie with great MoivePy
Results can be seen here

This make a 10 sec long videoclip showing hello world,using codec H264.

import moviepy.editor as moviepy

hello_world = moviepy.TextClip('Hello World!',font="Amiri-bold", fontsize=100, color='blue', size=(800,600))
hello_world = hello_world.set_duration(10)
hello_world.write_videofile('hello_world.avi', fps=24, codec='libx264')

Here a circle fade to text The End.

from moviepy.editor import *
from moviepy.video.tools.drawing import circle

clip = VideoFileClip("hello_world.avi", audio=False).\
           subclip(0,10).\
           add_mask()
w,h = clip.size

# The mask is a circle white vanishing radius r(t) = 800-200*t
clip.mask.get_frame = lambda t: circle(screensize=(clip.w,clip.h),
                                       center=(clip.w/2,clip.h/4),
                                       radius=max(0,int(800-200*t)),
                                       col1=1, col2=0, blur=4)

the_end = TextClip("The End", font="Amiri-bold", color="red",
                   fontsize=200).set_duration(clip.duration)
final = CompositeVideoClip([the_end.set_pos('center'),clip],
                           size =clip.size)
final.write_videofile('the_end.avi', fps=24, codec='libx264')

Edited by snippsat

0

New words:

tup = ('ello World','uello World')
print('\n'.join(chr(n)+tup[chr(n)=='Q']for n in range(66, 91)))
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