Howdy all. I've recently been considering doing an online meeting or webcast on certain subjects for which I have a lot of experience or knowledge. The idea being that something too long or complex for a Daniweb article can be more easily shown by sharing my desktop and talking about it, followed by Q&A.

However, something like this would certainly require at a minimal amount of people who are interested in joining before I put any effort into scheduling and preparing presentations. I'm thinking at least 10.

So I ask you: would you like to see a webcast of some form?

That could be pretty cool. I've considered doing something like that myself too. Not sure about the live Q&A part, it could be hard to gather a sufficient audience for that. Maybe you can try it in two parts: a video demonstration with an invitation to ask questions, and then Q&A video to follow up on those questions (if any). Something like Jonathan Blow's youtube channel.

As for ideas, well, I have held on, for about a year now, to the hope of eventually seeing you demonstrate the proper way to do object-oriented programming in C.

Creating functions that use inline assembly is another semi-dark art of C that I'd love to see explained properly.

And on a more subjective note, I would appreciate your take on subjects of "C for the C++ programmer"... i.e., like tips and tricks or advantages and disadvantages of C techniques that relate to common C++ patterns.

how the C standard library works under the hood.

I wasn't aware the C standard library had a hood... horse carriages usually don't have those. ;)

Not sure about the live Q&A part, it could be hard to gather a sufficient audience for that

Well, more like a video demonstration allowing topical questions that I can try to answer as I go, or at the end.

I have held on, for about a year now, to the hope of eventually seeing you demonstrate the proper way to do object-oriented programming in C.

I wasn't even aware of this interest. I'll see what I can come up with. :)

Creating functions that use inline assembly is another semi-dark art of C that I'd love to see explained properly.

That's a good one too, though I haven't found a whole lot of use for inline assembly lately in my own work.

I would appreciate your take on subjects of "C for the C++ programmer"... i.e., like tips and tricks or advantages and disadvantages of C techniques that relate to common C++ patterns.

That's a really good one, even though most of the topics would boil down to "how to write code when C++ isn't holding your hand". ;)

I wasn't aware the C standard library had a hood...

I have about 10,000 lines of simplified C standard library code that suggests otherwise. Certainly quite a bit shorter than even a simplified C++ standard library, but there's still a surprising amount of work hidden by the functions we use every day. And the library isn't finished either. A few hugely complicating components were intentionally left out, and I'm still debating adding them.

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.