ok well i started out with making my own source code then compiling and running with Dev-C++ and when i run it, its working fine until the last line, here let me past my code

// just a test
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    string mystr;
    cout << "Hello, whats your name? ";
    getline (cin, mystr);
    cout << "Hello " << mystr << ".\n";
    cout << "What grade are you in" << mystr << "? ";
    getline (cin, mystr);
    cout << "Thats cool, I used to be in " << mystr << "too.\n";
    cout << "Well i'm going to go now, goodbye.";
    return 0;
}

i know its stupid, i just started and wanted to do something, but ok when i get to the part "what grade are you in << mystr << "? "; and when i enter my grade or w/e the box just closes, is there any way to fix this, would i have to put something like Press "q" to quit or something like that? Any help would be nice, thankyou

run the in a command prompt then ull be able to see all the output before it quits. or try placing system("PAUSE") before the return statement, but i think thats bad practise to do that

run the in a command prompt then ull be able to see all the output before it quits. or try placing system("PAUSE") before the return statement, but i think thats bad practise to do that

Correct .
Its bad practice to use system calls to achieve such a trivial function.
Better use getchar() if using C and cin.get() when using C++.

Correct .
Its bad practice to use system calls to achieve such a trivial function.
Better use getchar() if using C and cin.get() when using C++.

is this because the code isnt portable to other systems?

Yes that and many other things to be considered like the kind of overhead introduced when you call system functions for trivial tasks.

A very good tutorial by my friend and forum member Mr. WaltP can be found here which introduces some of the things which should be avoided.
http://www.gidnetwork.com/b-61.html

getline() throws away the \n null character at the end of a string and therefore makes a mess when trying to fluch the buffer. Using cin.get() makes everything much more comfortable

getline() throws away the \n null character at the end of a string and therefore makes a mess when trying to fluch the buffer.

More surprises...

'\n' is a newline character, not null character ( '\0' )

Whoops! yep, i meant getline()'s terminating new line (\n) is read and thrown away. In get() this new line character is left in the input buffer

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