Hello,

I've put up some posts about the programming tools that I am currently using. So far, no takers.

This makes me wonder what people who know what they're doing are using!

M$'s IDE seemed overly complex for my modest needs. Besides, I have no use for the DLL and the windows specific libraries. I hope to impliment most of my stuff on Linux!

I would appreciate it if someone one enlighten me and perhps some of the other "noob" about the tools of the trade.

Without the proper tools, the task can be alot more difficult, if not impossible to accomplish in a reasonable time frame!

Any input would be appreciated.

I find IDEs to be helpful for larger projects, but if it's just a few files I use a text editor (vim). IMHO, everyone should start with a text editor though, and move to an IDE once they're comfortable with the language.

Microsoft VC compilers are really intended for mediam to large projects. Yes it is pretty complicated to learn, but you can't beat its debugger, object browser, intellsense, and several other features.

With single-file programs you will be better off using a simpler IDE like Dev-C++, or a command-line compiler and Notepad. I don't really like *nix command-line compilers very well because you have to manually write the makefiles, which can be more complex than the program you are writing. I'm just starting to learn Eclipse for fedora 6, which appears to have many of the same features as the Microsoft VC IDE.

I find Xcode (Mac OS X only) to be a very clean, simple, and easy-to-use IDE. You can choose to edit text files in seperate windows, or if you expand the project window, you can edit all the source code inside one window.

The debugger that comes with Xcode is also very intuitive.

As a hobbyist I find the convenience of an IDE to be wonderful. I don't have to fuss with command line arguments, makefiles, linkers, etc. From what I can tell compilers, makefiles, linkers, etc. seem implementer specific and not part of the language itself. The analagy I use is that makefiles, linkers and compilers are like the pencil, typewriter and wordprocessor. That is, they have to do with exression of the language, but not the language itself.

On the other hand, there is no doubt that IDEs have their own hassles. So take your pick. If you feel more comfortable with an IDE, go for it. If you like using bare bones, no frill tools, good for you.

Code::Blocks for small projects .

Never heard of it. Is is just a fancy Notepad with syntax coloring, or does it actually have options to use your favorite compiler (similar to what Dev-C++ does) ?

Naa... its not fancy something. Pretty impresive it is. Very powerful, can be used along with a lot of plugins for power users and so onand yeah very much along the line of Dev C++.

If you have some time at your hand, please see here
http://www.codeblocks.org/

Never heard of it. Is is just a fancy Notepad with syntax coloring, or does it actually have options to use your favorite compiler (similar to what Dev-C++ does) ?

Used it a while back after seeing ~sos~ comment about it in a previous post. What impressed me was that you could use a number of compilers simulataneously (gcc, g++, vc2003, vc2002, vc2005), and that it gave a much more educative and intuitive way of setting compiler options, that are not so easy to find for newbies using Visual Studio. But it started giving me a persistant error about some plugin, I think it was SVN, I uninstalled it. Actually it was written in the readme file that the SVN plugin was under development and not to use it, but I tried to and paid the price. :lol:. Couldn't find a way to disable it afterwards.

To disable the loading of Subversion plugin, goto

Plugins -> Manage Plugins -> uncheck Subversion Plugin -> Restart Codeblocks

Done and done.

PS: When did i mention Code blocks before... I used that term only in the sticky section and just a few posts back. Dont tell me you tried out that thing after seeing my 9.27 post :eek:

At the moment i'm using sharp develop for my vb.net and c# . net work.

It's wonderful, just like visual studio but totally free, and has the features I want like an easy GUI builder.

Hello,

I've put up some posts about the programming tools that I am currently using. So far, no takers.

This makes me wonder what people who know what they're doing are using!

M$'s IDE seemed overly complex for my modest needs. Besides, I have no use for the DLL and the windows specific libraries. I hope to impliment most of my stuff on Linux!

I would appreciate it if someone one enlighten me and perhps some of the other "noob" about the tools of the trade.

Without the proper tools, the task can be alot more difficult, if not impossible to accomplish in a reasonable time frame!

Any input would be appreciated.

Hi:

I use Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition; its very nice yet very complex. Honestly, it goes without saying that I do not use 1/4 of the option features but what is cool about that is that I discover new things on a daily basis to help my program build. Yes, it seems of course to be for large projects but I use it as I think it is valuable to make use of such a powerful tool, getting familiar with it so when I need it for massive projects the learning curve will be less.

I always used Bloodshed Dev-C++ when I was in school but switched to the MS compiler recently after a slew of anomalies in the Bloodshed compiler which I could not figure out or get around. I recommend Dev-C++ (I have a new copy of it again and I use it from time-to-time)

I guess its important to try a few and find which environment you feel most comfortable in. I find some compilers downright unbearable. My MS compiler is nice-- now only if I can learn to use it correctly LOL

Regards.

Hi sharky you say your interests lie with painting.

What's you slant on creating art using computer programs, such as 3d programs and real unbiased raytracers?

Hi sharky you say your interests lie with painting.

What's you slant on creating art using computer programs, such as 3d programs and real unbiased raytracers?

Hi iamthwee:

Creating art with computers is great, but I am not so versed in it yet. I really only play around with it in Photoshop, etc. I am amazed at the level and quality of art being produced with computers (I just looked at screenshots of "Gears of War" today-- amazing work AND interactive.)

I do not think computers will replace traditional artistic medium totally but it is definately giving it a run for its money. I am probably biased; my first college was an art school and computers as we know them where barely a reality yet.

I love art, science, programming-- I love to see the mix of all these mediums. Programming can surely be an art after (or as) one learns the science and craft of coding. The best software is equivalent IMOA to a perfect Renaissance painting.

Regards.

To disable the loading of Subversion plugin, goto

Plugins -> Manage Plugins -> uncheck Subversion Plugin -> Restart Codeblocks

Done and done.

Yes, I knew that. But somehow it didnt stop me getting some kind of dialog box. I don't usually trouble with software like that when it is an experiment.

PS: When did i mention Code blocks before... I used that term only in the sticky section and just a few posts back. Dont tell me you tried out that thing after seeing my 9.27 post :eek:

Don't recall. Do a search for code vlocksin your posts and you will find it. If it was you that mentioned it that is. :D

Yes, I knew that. But somehow it didnt stop me getting some kind of dialog box. I don't usually trouble with software like that when it is an experiment.

Hmm.. strange.

Don't recall. Do a search for code vlocksin your posts and you will find it. If it was you that mentioned it that is.

Huh !! What is "code vlocksin" ??? And how to search only within my posts ?:mrgreen:

I've put up some posts about the programming tools that I am currently using. So far, no takers.

This makes me wonder what people who know what they're doing are using!

I generally use VEdit as my editor and Borland 5.5 as my compiler. But if the compiler I decide to use has an IDE, I'll generally just use that.

I am a college student right now and I do almost all of my school coding with JOE on linux systems and compile with g++. I've also had to use Visual Studio 2003, which did make it easy to debug. I prefer the text editors and the command line because I feel at home there. When I use Visual Studio I feel like its doing all sorts of things I don't want it to do for me.

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