Wasn't sure what to put as the title, but what is happening is this:
I have div elements on a HTML page, when they click on the div it is replaced with a textarea containing the div contents in order to edit this (eventually there will be a form/submission button there, but I need to sort this first) but the problem is that in IE it is printing all tags in uppercase, is there a problem with my code or is just just another problem in IE? (I am using IE6, I have not tested in 7 or 8)

Code:
HTML:

<h2><br>Signing Course.</h2>
<div id="event_1" onclick="edit_content(this.id)">Barrie Paddon is soon to start a group for those wishing to learn basic sign language.<br>
Barrie who has achieved level 2 in British Sign Language led a large
group last year who spectacularly sang The Lord’s Prayer in sign
language. All interested please contact the office.<br></div>

JS:

<script type="text/javascript">
function edit_content(container) {
if(document.getElementById(container).innerHTML.substr(0,5) == "<text") {
} else {
document.getElementById(container).innerHTML = "<textarea name=\"" + container + "\" rows=\"10\" cols=\"90\">" + document.getElementById(container).innerHTML + "</textarea>";
editing = '1';
}
alert(document.getElementById(container).innerHTML.substr(0,5));
}
</script>

IE outputs:

Barrie Paddon is soon to start a group for those wishing to learn basic sign language.<BR>Barrie who has achieved level 2 in British Sign Language led a large group last year who spectacularly sang The Lord’s Prayer in sign language. All interested please contact the office.<BR>

into the textbox, and the alert shows '<TEXT'

Any ideas?

Thanks for the link. I did search google but I couldn't find anything, probably just searching the wrong way :(

So do you know of a better way to do this? I did think about using toLowerCase() but this would remove all capital letters from the text as well... For the moment I am using a replace on all <br> <BR> <br /> and <BR /> to convert them to newline characters, but eventually some HTML tags other than br will be added to the text so this is only a temporary fix...

Thanks again :)

The W3C-approved method of appending an element uses the createElement and appendChild methods. The innerHTML method is actually IE-specific, though other browsers have adopted it for compatibility with web sites using it. It is convenient, but as you found, more a kludge than a properly designed solution. Here is a quick sample of using the techniques:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title>Untitled</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<style type="text/css">
td{height:20px;width:40px;border:4px solid #daa;}
</style>
<script type="text/javascript">
function addRow(){
  var nw_td=document.createElement('td');
  var nw_txt=document.createTextNode("cell");
  nw_td.appendChild(nw_txt);
  var nw_tr=document.createElement('tr');
  nw_tr.appendChild(nw_td);
  document.getElementById('tbodOne').appendChild(nw_tr);
}
</script>
</head>
<body>
<table>
<tbody id="tbodOne">
<tr>
  <td>&nbsp;</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<a href="#" onclick="addRow();return false;">add row</a>
</body>
</html>

I found this example. http://www.quirksmode.org/dom/cms.html
But again, he uses 'TEXTAREA' and not 'textarea' :-/

Using the example given in the website,

<html>
<body>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
var editing  = false;

if (document.getElementById && document.createElement) {
	var butt = document.createElement('BUTTON');
	var buttext = document.createTextNode('Ready!');
	butt.appendChild(buttext);
	butt.onclick = saveEdit;
}

function catchIt(e) {
	if (editing) return;
	if (!document.getElementById || !document.createElement) return;
	if (!e) var obj = window.event.srcElement;
	else var obj = e.target;
	while (obj.nodeType != 1) {
		obj = obj.parentNode;
	}
	if (obj.tagName == 'TEXTAREA' || obj.tagName == 'A') return;
	while (obj.nodeName != 'P' && obj.nodeName != 'HTML') {
		obj = obj.parentNode;
	}
	if (obj.nodeName == 'HTML') return;
	var x = obj.innerHTML;
	var y = document.createElement('TEXTAREA');
	var z = obj.parentNode;
	z.insertBefore(y,obj);
	z.insertBefore(butt,obj);
	z.removeChild(obj);
	y.value = x;
	y.focus();
	editing = true;
}

function saveEdit() {
	var area = document.getElementsByTagName('TEXTAREA')[0];
	var y = document.createElement('P');
	var z = area.parentNode;
	y.innerHTML = area.value;
	z.insertBefore(y,area);
	z.removeChild(area);
	z.removeChild(document.getElementsByTagName('button')[0]);
	editing = false;
}

document.onclick = catchIt;
</script>
</head>
<p> This is a test! </p>
</body>
</html>

There's no reason you can't change "TEXTAREA" to "textarea" in the code. IE will still report the tag in upper case, however, if queried. Note that if you use a transitional DOCTYPE the case shouldn't be an issue for validation.

There's no reason you can't change "TEXTAREA" to "textarea" in the code.

You are absolutely right ! :icon_lol:

IE will still report the tag in upper case, however, if queried. Note that if you use a transitional DOCTYPE the case shouldn't be an issue for validation.

Hmm! I didn't know that..

Give this a try in different browsers; you'll see what I mean. Opera and FF do the same thing as IE, Konqueror, (and, presumably, Safari), preserves the case of the tag itself:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" 
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title>test</title>
<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<script type="text/javascript">
window.onload=function(){
alert(document.getElementById("bod").tagName);
}
</script>
</head>
<body id="bod">
</body>
</html>

I suspect this is a remnant of earlier implementations that the browser vendors just haven't felt was necessary to address. This is, after all, an internal reference.

A thought occurs, if you want to have the tags appear as lowercase text within a dynamically generated element, you can take the text string generated by the browser and use a regular expression to find the text within <>, but not within "", and convert it to lowercase before sending the converted string to the alert. The alert should treat the string as inviolable.

Thanks for the ideas :)

Upper case tags are a no, I work in XHTML1.0 Strict :D
The suggestions posted are alot longer than my original, but if they are better in terms of standards then its all good.
I'll let you know how it goes :)

I recently read that the W3C is, in fact, recommending HTML 4.01 for current web pages. XHTML, it is said, is still considered "under development". Just so you know.

This is a known issue with IE. It will return any request for the innerHTML or outterHTML as a mess of UPPERCASE tags, with attributes with no double quotes, style content exploded, re-aranged and UPPERCASE, with non-self closing tags... e.g. br, hr, img, link... etc.

A discussion about this can be found on Web Bug Track.

http://webbugtrack.blogspot.com/2008/01/bug-or-feature-round-one.html

It is also a "live" HTML value in IE, which includes the updated contents of a form element (if that is what you are inspecting)

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