The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has released the latest version of its 'Who Has Your Back?' [report](https://www.eff.org/who-has-your-back-government-data-requests-2015) and accompanying infographic, and it makes for interesting reading. Once you appreciate that what the EFF is talking about here is how good, measured as a response to a handful of yes or no questions, a bunch of leading tech companies are at protecting our data from government snooping requests. It's not about privacy in the larger scheme of things, just from that particular angle. That said, let's look at how the EFF came to the conclusions that can be seen in the …

Member Avatar
+1 forum 0

I found this article from the EFF quite disturbing. What do you say about a company that would want to do this? ... Thoughts? Comments? Scathing Rebuttals?? [url]http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/08/steve-jobs-watching-you-apple-seeking-patent-0[/url]

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 18

The Maine State Bureau of Consumer Credit Protection reported today that it has received a query from an unnamed out-of-state finance company about placing Global Positioning System units into vehicles it finances or that its customers used as collateral, according to an [URL="http://www.bangordailynews.com/story/Statewide/GPS-data-intruding-on-privacy,151289"]article [/URL]in the [I]Bangor Daily News[/I]. Such GPSes were not intended to help the company repossess the vehicle more easily or to track it in case of theft, but to ensure that the person was working by analyzing the person's traffic pattern, said bureau of consumer credit protection superintendent Will Lund, according to the article. Worse, Lund said …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 6

It's enough to make anyone froth at the mouth: Film parodies making use of a ranting Hitler, with added subtitles explaining what current event he was ranting about -- which have grown increasingly popular on YouTube -- are gradually disappearing after a request from the company that owns the film. Though the spoofs -- which run the gamut from political issues to the loss of the next-generation iPhone -- are parodies and protected by fair use, the technology that YouTube is reportedly using to detect them can't tell the difference, according to the Electronic Frontier Foundation. "Because the Content I.D. …

Member Avatar
+0 forum 0

Given that some courts have found that people can be [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry3596.html"]charged[/URL] for violating the terms of service of a particular site, it's important to keep track of what the terms of service are so you don't inadvertently violate them. (Incidentally, some other [URL="http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2009/05/mass-sjc-tosses-calixte-warrant"]courts[/URL] are finding that violating terms-of-service policies are [I]not[/I] worth criminal charges.) But what do you do if a site changes its policies, as [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry4337.html"]Twitter[/URL] has been known to do? Now there's help. A new site, [URL="http://www.tosback.org/timeline.php"]TOSBack[/URL], sponsored by the Electronic Frontier Foundation, tracks 44 terms-of-service policies, and notes when and what changes are made. Sites that TOSBack …

Member Avatar
+0 forum 0

Here we go again, it is silly season at Apple as an iPhone application feeding news from a civil liberties organisation is banned and Hitler gets the blame. Just two days ago I posted a news story entitled '[URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry4408.html"]You don't have to be easily offended to be an iPhone app approver, but it helps[/URL]' which explained how an eBook reader app was banned because it might be used to view sexually explicit texts. This coming on top of other mad decisions, apparently taken to protect those who are prone to be offending by everything, such as banning a game featuring …

Member Avatar
+0 forum 0

The End.