Almost exactly a year ago I was writing about [the development of Google Glass](http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/pc-hardware/monitors-displays-and-video-cards/news/426788/no-google-glass-for-most-developers-until-2014) here at DaniWeb. In the meantime, the project has turned into a reality and [actual product has got into the hands of reviewers](http://www.pcpro.co.uk/features/380401/before-iwatch-and-google-glass-wearable-computing-milestones-and-failures/2) and some lucky users with $1,500 to spare. This would all be much more exciting for me were it not for the fact that my vision is severely impaired thanks to suffering from Wet Macular Degeneration in one eye (hence the patch) and the other being very lazy indeed. I get by with the use of a contact lens and high magnification reading …

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On the same day that [URL="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-11225197"]UK Business Secretary, Vince Cable, has been explaining that Government sees "no justification for taxpayers' money being used to support research which is neither commercially useful nor theoretically outstanding"[/URL] and that universities will be expected to "do more for less" an event has been showcasing the latest near-market products and technologies that have evolved from just such research. [youtube]5yMEYXweFjc[/youtube] The 'Meerkats and Avatars' event held at the Hauser Forum and organized by St John's Innovation Centre, took place today and served as a great reminder that commercially viable science and technology innovation is most certainly …

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The answer is [URL="http://www.baolab.com"]Baolab Microsystems[/URL] which has today announced its NanoEMS technology to do just that, construct nanoscale Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) within the structure of a CMOS wafer rather than building on the surface like current techniques. This, says Baolab, means that because it uses less process steps but standard high volume CMOS lines, will reduce the manufacturing costs of a MEMS by up to two thirds. Using the existing metal layers in a CMOS wafer to form the MEMS structure using standard mask techniques, the NanoEMS process etches the Inter Metal Dielectric (IMD) through the pad openings …

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Now that's what I call a really cool idea, an air-fuelled battery for the [URL="http://www.itpro.co.uk/blogs/daveyw/2009/05/19/confession-i-am-sleeping-with-my-iphone/"]ever popular iPhone[/URL]. Actually, it is more than an idea, this is a development with legs. University researchers in the UK, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council ([URL="http://www.epsrc.ac.uk"]EPSRC[/URL]) have designed something called the STAIR cell. The STAIR, short for St Andrews Air (the [URL="http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk"]University of St Andrews[/URL] is the lead researcher on the project) battery uses oxygen drawn from thin air to produce a reaction within porous carbon to create the electrical charge. The good news being that this pretty green and clean …

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It all sounds a little science fiction, but according to scientists at MIT it seems that a virus powered iPhone, laptop and even car are all possibilities stemming from research they have been doing. Although the potential for building batteries from viruses was discovered a few years ago, the MIT team behind the research now reckons that it has progressed to a point where the material being produced is powerful enough to power a car. What they have done is use viruses to create both the negative and positive charged anodes and cathodes that make up the component parts of …

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Scientists from the University of Glasgow in Scotland have developed a nanotech switch, the size of a molecule, which could herald the 500,000 GB iPod. [URL="http://www.electropages.com/viewArticle.aspx?intArticle=10607"]The scientists reckon[/URL] that the breakthrough means an iPod could increase its capacity by no less than 150,000 times the current storage capability. Professor Lee Cronin and Dr Malcolm Kadodwala say that the 500,000 GB capacity will be possible on a single square inch, compare that to the current maximum for such a space of just 3.3 GB and you'll understand why people are getting excited. If, as the Glasgow team believe, it means that …

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A rather interesting [URL="http://www.eetimes.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=206903246"]article in the EETimes[/URL] suggests that the holy grail of artificial intelligence, the ability to pass the Turing Test, may become a reality later this year courtesy of a collaboration between IBM and the [URL="http://www.rpi.edu/"]Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute[/URL]. The [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_test"]Turing Test[/URL] was first described by Alan Turing back in 1950, and requires a human being acting as a judge to hold a natural language conversation with a machine and with another human being and not be able to tell which is which. So far, no machine has been able to pass this simple test. But now the AI …

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Anyone with an interest in the history of computing will know that the first mechanical computer was invented by one Charles Babbage, British mathematician and visionary. If you happen to be in the vicinity of the Science Museum in London you can even see a working difference engine, something Babbage never did in his lifetime as he died before a prototype could be completed. Amazingly, according to [URL="http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=313000&intsrc=hm_list"]this story[/URL] a number of scientists in the US are now working once more on mechanical computers. Fair play, they are likely to weigh less then the two ton steampunk Babbage creation, a …

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Scientists at IBM have finally managed to get around the problem of electrical interference that prevented signals from working correctly while using the carbon mesh material of grapheme. It means that they can now get on with the job in hand of building nanoscale transistors according to this [URL="http://www.technewsworld.com/rsstory/62064.html"]report[/URL].

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How small can a laser get? Good question, and according to the physicists at the [URL="http://www.nist.gov/"]National Institute of Standards and Technology[/URL] (NIST) the answer is very small indeed, one single quantum dot small perhaps. To put this into some perspective, a typical microdisk laser of the type currently used in experiments by NIST and Stanford Univeristy is constructed of layers of indium arsenide on top of gallium arsenide, the resulting etched out diskj being 1.8 micrometers across and containing an average of 130 quantum dot islands of indium arsenide in each one. The newly developed micrometer-sized solid-state lasers see a …

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Some would say blue, given the amount of sex that can be found on the web. Others might go for black, thinking along the lines of increasing online crime. To many the whole idea of Internet technology is a grey area. But, my friends, thanks to researchers at the Chinese Academy of Science, the University of Leuven in Belgium and Washington State University, the answer could soon become a lot more black and white as they plan to dye the Internet to make it run faster. No, I have not been on the sherry again, this is a serious technology …

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The End.