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I am pretty proficient in C++ and Java. I know that most progrmas could be written in either language. My question for those of you who have been out there for a while, do companies tend to use one programming language for certain types of programs? For example, is C++ typically used for larger applications and Java used more for web based programs?

I tend to like working with Java more, but am not so interested in web development(seems a lot of Java jobs deal with using JSP and servlets). Do I need to choose the type of programming I want to do, then go with the language most widely used, or is it feasible to choose the language I want to work with and be able to get into the type of programming I want?

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Last Post by surojit das
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Hi,

I cannot comment really on what the big development world uses, but I know I use C++ for accessing parallel ports / hardware in Linux, and use shell scripts to manage the file system.

I think a lot of your behind-the-scenes drivers are going to be C or C++ based. JAVA is interpreted, and that means slow down when running through the libraries.

Christian

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I think it has a lot more to do with who is in charge of the project technically. People have preferences and they tend to go with what they like.

Being good at both is a good way to go to AN job.

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Thanks for the replies. One more question, C#, how has that been doing in the busisness world? Is it becoming popular or is C++ and Java still the better way to go? Is it worth the time to learn it?

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JAVA is interpreted, and that means slow down when running through the libraries.

Just to let you know, thats not true. Java is actually quicker than C++, since libraries are determined before its compiled. So once compiled, the library is carried with the program, unlike C, which has to determine after

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Java is actually quicker than C++, since libraries are determined before its compiled. So once compiled, the library is carried with the program, unlike C, which has to determine after

almost correct. The real reason is that the bytecode compiler can create optimised code for every specific platform it may run on.
Java may LOAD slower than C++ (especially if you count JVM startup time) but once the program starts running there will not be a significant difference.
This is especially true for programs that spend most of their time waiting for user input.
What does it matter if your calculations take 10ms or 11ms if the application then has to wait a minute for the user?

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