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Is anyone here familiar with this? It makes a lot of promises, particularly that [with hard work] you can get enough programming knowledge within six months to get an entry-level job. In the same author's book, Teach Yourself C++ in 21 days, she explains that if you put in 12 hours of study a week, through about six months, you should know enough C++ to get an entry level programming position.

So what I'm wondering, has anyone had success with these books, or simply from teaching yourself a programming language and skipping any sort of college or technical university? To make this clearer, how long did it take those of you who have jobs in the programming field to get those jobs (from the point you knew near nothing about programming to the day you were hired)? How old were you when you got your job? Is it considered atypical in the IT industry to hire someone under the age of 21?

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Last Post by pty
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Is anyone here familiar with this? It makes a lot of promises, particularly that [with hard work] you can get enough programming knowledge within six months to get an entry-level job. In the same author's book, Teach Yourself C++ in 21 days, she explains that if you put in 12 hours of study a week, through about six months, you should know enough C++ to get an entry level programming position.

So what I'm wondering, has anyone had success with these books, or simply from teaching yourself a programming language and skipping any sort of college or technical university? To make this clearer, how long did it take those of you who have jobs in the programming field to get those jobs (from the point you knew near nothing about programming to the day you were hired)? How old were you when you got your job? Is it considered atypical in the IT industry to hire someone under the age of 21?

Unfortunately employers seem to want either a degree (CS/IT or something similar) or lots of experience - when recruiting they indicate that the candidate will be able to do the job.

From my experience, when you apply for entry level jobs you're likely to be up against candidates who will have degrees. Generally, people with a Degree have a better chance of getting to the interview stage - its just the way it works.

Even if you become extremely profficient in a given language, employers will probably be reluctant to give you a chance unless you have a lot of professional development experience or a qualification.

I think to get your foot in the door maybe some Industry qualifications (MCP style) may help, or offering your services free of charge in order to gain experience (ie helping a local company out or contributing to an open source project)

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