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They have bootcamp. They can load Windows and Mac. It's old news boot look it sucks. Why can they run Windows, and my Intel board cant run Mac? When will Mac stop being such proprietary stiffs and let other people who dont want to buy a Mac use OSX?

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MACs suck balls
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Last Post by UrbanKhoja
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I have used the mac for a while and I must say I did not find it impressive or worth the hype. The interface was good, yes, but nothing worth all the hype that surrounds it. The iBook G4 I used looked cool, but the OS itself was ok. Personally, I think I'll stick with XP.

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They have bootcamp. They can load Windows and Mac. It's old news boot look it sucks. Why can they run Windows, and my Intel board cant run Mac? When will Mac stop being such proprietary stiffs and let other people who dont want to buy a Mac use OSX?

Apple is primarily a hardware company. If they 'open' OSX and allow it to run on other computers then other companies would produce cheaper machines and eat into Apples profits.

Also, because Apple have control of the hardware, OS and drivers they help ensure OSX is extremely stable and works with other Apple branded hardware.

I suggest you look into FreeBSD (where apple based OSX) and other projects such as Darwin.

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The crapy and good thing about mac is that the processors are alot slower than the ones designed for pcs, BUT the great thing is that mac runs differently than windows and slower processors than pc bult processors dont really matter because mac runs faster with them.

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The crapy and good thing about mac is that the processors are alot slower than the ones designed for pcs, BUT the great thing is that mac runs differently than windows and slower processors than pc bult processors dont really matter because mac runs faster with them.

I don't know if you've been living under a rock or something for the past 2 years but Macs now use Intel chips, they are as fast as any other machine and can run Windows just as well.

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I am pretty sure that microsoft has a product that lets you run dual OS's on your windows computer if you want that

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I am pretty sure that microsoft has a product that lets you run dual OS's on your windows computer if you want that

Do you mean something like VMWare? That's not that impressive.

More interesting, you can use PearPC to emulate a G4 processor, which will allow you to run Mac OS X on an Intel machine (such as Windows). It's a gray area of the law though, because Apple doesn't exactly want people emulating Mac OS X... the project still survives though.

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I they use Intel now but, you dont really see processors for them in the 3GHZ zone, Unless of course you have some money!!!!!

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but as was said earlier, macs have a history of being able to do more with their processors then pcs and so that 2.00 ghz goes pretty far

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although macs tend to have a much bigger price tag, they are generally much faster, although the specs say otherwise, macs are a bit like bee's, they scientifically cannont fly yet they can, you would think a 3ghz 512mb ram pc would outperfom the humble 2ghz 256mb ram mac; rarely, the mac os runs alot faster than windows and has a lot less internal programs, from expericance macs get very few if any viruses or spyware.

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but as was said earlier, macs have a history of being able to do more with their processors then pcs and so that 2.00 ghz goes pretty far

although macs tend to have a much bigger price tag, they are generally much faster, although the specs say otherwise, macs are a bit like bee's, they scientifically cannont fly yet they can, you would think a 3ghz 512mb ram pc would outperfom the humble 2ghz 256mb ram mac; rarely, the mac os runs alot faster than windows

You both left out a crucial fact: there's only 1 Mac model that isn't dual-core: the basic-edition Mac Mini. All the others are dual-core, and this means a lot of performance gains.

Sure, my 1.83 Ghz MacBook obviously won't run at 3.6 Ghz just because it's dual-core, but it really shows up when you're using a lot of processor-intesive applications at the same time.

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even though i have a nice acer aspire now, i still miss the old mac book, much faster at boot up as well

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I'm also one of those people that are jealous of the macs. They jsut seem so simple and downt o earth. Whenever I go to Fry's with my dad, I have to just stop off at the Apple section -- take a picture with that crazy camera (effects decked out), or try out Garage Band. The window options (maximize and such) are a bit awkward being in the top left after using windows for so long... but it's fine. It's not too much different from trying out new distributions of linux. Maybe one day I'll have a Mac, or OSX running.

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I guess you should take a look at this if you already haven't.

That's a really great article. The author put it to perspective how a typical person would react to a new environment after being in one so long.

But then again, this Pete guy he talks about seems to have quite a bit of street knowledge about computers. 6 years now, and he's doing well for himself. So no doubt he would have hear of Apple computers and their MaxOS. The facts would have drifted over to him saying that it is pretty much completely different in use than Windows. I'm just thinking out loud about what should be expected. But assuming what I thought to be relatively correct, then Pete would expect to be stepping into a whole other system when sitting in front of the white computer. The keyboard looks different that a windows keyboard... so wouldn't he expect it to react differently and not have the same shortcuts?

Once again, I really think the author described a typical situation very well. But to someone with 6 years of knowledge on windows, I'd expect him to jump into Mac OS, not with utter astonishment, but entertainment of sorts. This is something new, and should be experimented with.

Sorry for rambling, hopefully it came out legible and comprehendable.

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Some interesting points you made there.

But then again, this Pete guy he talks about seems to have quite a bit of street knowledge about computers. 6 years now, and he's doing well for himself. So no doubt he would have hear of Apple computers and their MaxOS. The facts would have drifted over to him saying that it is pretty much completely different in use than Windows. I'm just thinking out loud about what should be expected. But assuming what I thought to be relatively correct, then Pete would expect to be stepping into a whole other system when sitting in front of the white computer. The keyboard looks different that a windows keyboard... so wouldn't he expect it to react differently and not have the same shortcuts?

Once again, I really think the author described a typical situation very well. But to someone with 6 years of knowledge on windows, I'd expect him to jump into Mac OS, not with utter astonishment, but entertainment of sorts. This is something new, and should be experimented with.

Sorry for rambling, hopefully it came out legible and comprehendable.

Well, yeah, Pete would have heard of the MacOS. But as a person who has had no experience with a MacOS, what would have he heard about it? It would not have been wrong to say that he would have heard his MacOS using friends say, how nice a GUI it has, how seemlessly it's programs tend to work, how marvellously crash free it is, and the only time it crashes is when they try to run MS Word in it, and so on.

Everybody knows that the Macintosh has an elegant user interface, right? The very paradigm of ease-of-use?

So it would be fair for him to expect an OS much easier to use than Windows. None of these "marketing" opinions consider the fact that, however "clunky" the MS Windows GUI maybe, MS Windows users are used to that clunky interface, and invariably expect all MS Windows applications to work like that.
I'll quote the beginning of the preface for the Unix Hater's Guidebook which gives a similar thing but on a much lighter vein.

“I liken starting one’s computing career with Unix, say as an undergraduate, to being born in East Africa. It is intolerably hot, your body is covered with lice and flies, you are malnourished and you suffer from numerous curable diseases. But, as far as young East Africans can tell, this is simply the natural condition and they live within it. By the time they find out differently, it is too late. They already think that the writing of shell scripts is a natural act.”
— Ken Pier, Xerox PARC

Yes. Most people I know will be fascinated initially by a change in the environment a MacOS has to offer. The panel you see in the desktop is a cool way of launching applications at first. But when you want to get some work done and want some extra windows open and you want that panel to dissappear, a regualar MS Windows user usually expects to be able to right click and select hide, or press a close button in the upper right hand corner. If he has to fumble once or twice to do a simple task like that, or has to google for that, then the MacOS GUI becomse clunky to him. It all reduces what we are used to and how we expect things to happen.

I think this was what Rashakil Fol meant when he said that life is too short to worry about OSes. Users tend to use what they are most comfortable with, and find other tools that differ clunky.

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