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Hi, first time poster here.

Well, I would like some feedback from those out there about getting into the development side (or any side) from my situation.
I do believe I am somewhat of a techie. When I was in middle/high school I was using a tad of sparc assembly trying to do what everyone was doing then - overflowing buffers, breaking root, etc. I would play with my little openbsd boxes at home, had some old 8086s lying around, and ran a few machines with minix. Administered some small redhat network for free if I remember correctly... I was a geek in general, but nothing over the top. Just punk teenager stuff. Fast forward to now: I am 26, have a liberal arts degree from a state school, and haven't really been involved with any serious kind of computing what so ever in about 10 years due to the department of justice asking me not to.

I am coming off of a failed business venture and now must figure out a way to make a living in this brave new world. I have zero experience with modern languages, can't remember *anything* from my past computerland excursions, can't program a lick. But I have faith I can learn it quickly if necessary. People with a mere 2-3 years work experience seem to make a decent living as developers, which seems to be a good payoff for time spent..

Going back to school and getting a degree in CS isn't really what I'm looking to do, since I finished university in 2002. I would consider graduate school, but i don't think they take people without CS undergrads and I am horrible at math anyway.

Just looking for some ideas on how one in my situation would work his way into IT/tech/programming world. Studying on my own isn't a program, but just wondering how some of you would attack this situation.

In case you're wondering, my previous work experience has nothing to do with anything tech.

Thank you all.

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Last Post by DangerDev
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You need to get on the ladder. Get a job that introduces you to IT and build off that. Remember, the best jobs come from who you know, not what you know. Start to network with people in the business you want to be part of. Thats about all I can offer you.

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so should he really go get a degree in Information Tech? and start building from there?

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see, its all about passion.
if you have passion for computing, and you enjoy life with computer then, just do it.enjoy the it.
thing is that once you will build career, it will be tough for you to return.
so start now itself.

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