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I wonder if there's any difference between Dreamweaver 8 (which I'm currently using) and Dreamweaver UltraDev (which I've heard is mainly for ASP).

Basically, since I'm looking for a job as a Website Developer & as the employer often ask for not just HTML based skill but also CSS, XML, XHTML, PHP, ASP, SQL etc., I wonder how relevant is having hands-on experience in Dreamweaver 8 is ???

So far, I've a basic knowledge of SQL & have hands-on experience in HTML. After reading couple of books on Dreamweaver, I feel comfortable with using CSS, as well.

All I know about ASP is that it builts dyanamic forms on the Internet, along with connecting Database like MS Access & (perhaps) SQL, as well. I wonder if Dreamweaver 8 covers ALL ASPECTS of ASP. Beside, does the same software cover ALL ASPECTS of XML, XHTML, etc.

I reckon, having negligible knowledge about programming, there's no bloody way I could possibly feel comfortable with typing weird looking programming code, so I wonder if such a software like Dreamweaver 8 makes life any easier for someone like me ???

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Last Post by Esopo
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If you don't know a server-side language, you're not a Web "Developer". If you want a job as a Web Developer, you need to become a Developer, which by definition means learning a programming language. Dreamweaver is absolutely irrelevant to that.

If you are great at HTML & CSS, and have artistic talent, you might qualify as a Web Designer.

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If you want a job as a Web Developer, you need to become a Developer, which by definition means learning a programming language. Dreamweaver is absolutely irrelevant to that.

I disagree profusely. Dreamweaver is an IDE for web development.
A common definition of web development is the integration of all necessary technologies to produce a web site. That is exactly what Dreamweaver is, an integration of all the technologies in an enviroment that makes things as easy as possible.

A DW professional, meaning a professional web developer that uses DW to create websites, can create all sorts of sites.

DW8 has all the features of previous versions plus better CSS handling, support por PHP5, XML ,etc.

http://www.macromedia.com/software/dreamweaver/productinfo/features/

I should know, I've been using DW professionally for the last 5 years.

Now, to answer your question,
ASFAIK Dreamweaver UltraDev was an alternative version to DW4 (many years ago) that had advanced programming tools lacking in the standard version. Those tools were then integrated into DW MX 2002 and ever since DW has all the tools in a single package.

About DW8's relevance to get a job,
Some employers will require that you know DW8. Those are generally the companies that use Macromedia technologies such as DW, Fireworks, Flash, ColdFusion for the server and Contribute for the customers. A web developer without a good grasp of DW8 would fall short in such an enviroment.

Companies that do not use Macromedia will probably be more interested in each of the technologies that DW encompasses more than DW itself. Such technologies being (as you mentioned earlier) something like:

For the server-side: PHP, SQL, XML
For the client-side: HTML, XHTML, CSS, Javascript

I wonder if Dreamweaver 8 covers ALL ASPECTS of ASP. Beside, does the same software cover ALL ASPECTS of XML, XHTML, etc.

Yes, and yes. Dreamweaver supports development in PHP, ASP and ColdFusion. It allows you to code by hand (if you will) or use their extensive set of tools to stablish and manage DB connections and perform several common operations.
It also supports valid and semantically correct CSS, HTML & xHTML and the latest version has XML handling (that I haven't tried so I can't comment on it).

there's no bloody way I could possibly feel comfortable with typing weird looking programming code, so I wonder if such a software like Dreamweaver 8 makes life any easier for someone like me ???

DW is a professional tool. You CAN create sites without a single line of code, but I would strongly advise you learn the technologies properly.
Also, DW is not Microsoft Word. Using it coherently is going to take some training. If you are:
1. Serious about web development, and
2. Sure about wanting to stay as away from code as possible
I would recommend you take DW classes and solidify your knowledge with a certificate. If someone can teach yout to make full web sites without writing a single line of code is Macromedia (Adobe) themselves:
http://www.macromedia.com/support/training/certified_professional_program/

Cheers and good luck!

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I stand corrected. If Dreamweaver allows server- and client-side coding, then yes, that would make it a Developer's tool.

I do stand solidly by the distiction between a Web Developer and a Web Designer, however.

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I do stand solidly by the distiction between a Web Developer and a Web Designer, however.

I agree with you on that. Also, getting started with web technologies is not hard, but there is a long road to travel from "web developer" to "good web developer". Sadly, a road that often has to be traveled alone.

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