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I think this is the right forum for this type of question as opposed to the C++ forum.

I'm learning C++ via Windows Vista, console stuff, at the moment. I've also got Ubunto installed and trying to figure out which programs I need in order to write simple console type C++ applications. I'm relatively new to Linux so easy step by step guidelines would be nice.

Any help appreciated.

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Last Post by superjacent
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For graphical text editors on Linux, I highly recommend Geany, which is a "lightweight" IDE and is exactly what it says. Its not very bloated at all but has the most helpful features of IDEs such as code completion and custom compiler/interpreter integration. Otherwise, I might also recommend Vim if your planning on using the command line but (WARNING) it DOES have a HUGE learning curve. If you insist on using the command line for your work but want something much easier, I'd recommend checking out GNU Nano.

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The best text editor for linux is emacs. I suggest you try it.

That's subjective statement at best, and is worthless unless you give some objective reasoning supporting it.

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Ok fine. Reasons why emacs is *the best*:

1. It's extensible and configurable. Emacs Lisp (or Elisp) is extremely powerful. In fact, most of emacs is written in Elisp.
2. It provides a uniform environment. Emacs integrates the entire process of writing, compiling, and debugging into one seamless interface.
3. It's versatile. Emacs can be used as a diary, planner, calender, telnet client, MUD client, bash shell (eshell), irc client, and much much more.

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Negative rep actually does count here.. Just not for the dude b/c he has no rep points :D
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Ok fine. Reasons why emacs is *the best*:

1. It's extensible and configurable. Emacs Lisp (or Elisp) is extremely powerful. In fact, most of emacs is written in Elisp.
2. It provides a uniform environment. Emacs integrates the entire process of writing, compiling, and debugging into one seamless interface.
3. It's versatile. Emacs can be used as a diary, planner, calender, telnet client, MUD client, bash shell (eshell), irc client, and much much more.

Point # 2 I like.

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