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Last Post by )BIG"B"Affleck
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It depends what, exactly, you'd like tutorials on? Check out our TechTutorials forum for a linux quick reference to commands. Also, a Samba tutorial to link your Linux computer up to your Windows one.

Are you having a problem with something in particular?

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Well, you can start by choosing a distribution. Everyone says Mandrake and RedHat are good for beginners - but RedHat is reaching end-of-life soon so it might not be a good choice. You can download Linux for free so it's not hard to get started.

Once you're up and running, just browse around getting a feel for how it all works. You can use the cd command via a terminal to browse up and down directory structures ... ls to list the files in the current directory. the more command is used to show the contents of a file. Of course, you should become familiar with startx to start the XWindows graphical environment. Be sure to install a desktop environment such as either KDE or Gnome. :)

Also, the best way to learn is simply to read up on linux forums and the like. Read about problems other people encountered and how they were solved. Then play around yourself.

This site has a bunch of good linux threads. Also check out http://www.justlinux.com - nice site there ;)

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I am a complete noobie. I don't know anything about Linux. Can someone please give me some tutorials?

There are several ways to go about this.

I can't rcommend Red Hat (now Fedora, for all practical end-user purposes) or Mandrake for beginners, though Mandrake has a live-CD version. A newbie should not be forced to install Linux just to try it out. The best way to start is with a CD-bootable Linux, if you have enough memory (128 MB or more. "More" is better :)). That way, you can experiment in a "sandbox" until you feel comfortable enough to install Linux as a dual-boot (or triple-boot) system.

The best known Live Linux-on-CD distributions are Knoppix and an up-and comer, Mepis. These run entirely from CD but can also be used as Linux install discs. They are both based on Debian, one of the leading free distros and KDE, the K Desktop Environment. Lindows and Xandros are both also based on Debian and KDE.

The leading alternate GUI (graphical user interface) under Linux is GNOME, the GNU Object Modeling Environment, which has its own live CD, Gnoppix.

There are a number of Linux portals available for beginners to get information. These include YoLinux, Linux.org, and Linux.com. Once you feel more comfortable with Linux and want to dig deeper, check out the Linux Documentation Project.

Knoppix is my favorite; it's what I used to install Linux on my system once I felt comfortable with it. It includes Mozilla, OpenOffice.org, and much more -- and more can be downloaded easily using the Debian apt-get system. Knoppix.net is a lively forum with users helping users, even total beginners. Since these are all free for download, feel free to experiment. It helps to have broadband :cheesy: .

Other uses for a live Linux CD include as a Windows rescue disc and as a hardware testing disc.

Votes + Comments
Thorough response to a broad question
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Are there single cd's available for knoppix cd's in the market?
http://www.nondos.com/frames/download_knoppix.html

how can i download knoppix from there manually and then get a cd...u wil notice that the knoppix there is more than 850 mb so which means I better get a floppy but how can I use the blank floppy.

You mean blank CD-R, right? Actually, the ISO image file is about 700 MB, hence my comment about "broadband is good", but there are alternatives: http://www.Knoppix.net has both download links and purchase links. There are Knoppix mirrors all over the world, but you can also buy disks for $5 or even less on-line. You may also be able to buy them locally -- find a local Linux user group (LUG) via GLUE and ask if they will sell you one. Odds on, they will -- they might even give you one free or cheap. I have probably distributed nearly a hundred CDs this way myself to interested newbies.

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camelNotation, check out these sites for downloading a distro:
http://linuxiso.org/
http://www.distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=cd

The second site has a bunch of cd or live distros to download. I use both knoppix and slack-live when I am at school and work. Knoppix will fit on 1 cd, and slack-live is even smaller.

These sites should help you get started:
http://frf.hypermart.net/linux-newbie/index.htm
http://dsl.org/cookbook/

Of course if you have a specific question, come back here for some help. There are alot of linux distros and only you will know what is the best. You might have to try a few of them to find the one that you like.

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I went into my bios setup for a trip before really installling.It was like:

primary boot location:hdd-0
secondary boot location:floppy
tertiary boot location:cd

now,if i change the primary boot location to a cd rom,should i change the secondary location to hdd-0 ?

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If you change your primary boot to a cdrom then your secondary will automatically be changed to hdd0 - theoretically, at least ;)

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...if i change the primary boot location to a cd rom, should i change the secondary location to hdd-0 ?

I usually do
1: CD-ROM
2: Floppy (or FDD-0)
3: IDE-0 (or HDD-0)

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I am a complete noobie. I don't know anything about Linux. Can someone please give me some tutorials?

I am a complete noobie. I don't know anything about Linux. Can someone please give me some tutorials?

Ok Im going to start you out with slackware9.1 borderline well its basiclly freeBSD I think you will do well. I hope you have a broadband connection and burner. Go to www.linuxiso.org sort by letter s- for slackware and choose the new release 9.1. Download that at night leave your comp on, It will be a while hope you have a firewall. After you have downloaded those two burn them as a ISO image.
Then go into your BIOS and change to boot from CD-ROM. After that place in Disk 1 and reboot and follow my friend gore's tut.HINT: (print this b4 install)

Slackware Tutorial written entirely by my best friend gore from MI dayton ave.

How to install Slackware Linux 9.1.


Written by: gore.

Slackware Linux has reputation for being hard to install. I disagree with this. I have installed Slackware about 20 times now, and I have yet to use a book or manual. I think what catches most people off guard is the fact that the Slackware installation is in text.

Free BSD and Debian Linux are also text based installs. Dont let this stop you though, just because it is text does not mean it is hard. In this tutorial, I will be assuming a few things; First, I will NOT be partitioning so that Windows will be on the same disk. The install makes you partition for Slackware anyway, so if you can do this, you should be able to partition a Windows PC without any problems.

I will assume you will be using the PC for Slackware Linux only. And that you can boot from a CD-ROM drive. If you cannot boot from a CD-ROM, then make boot floppies, the install will look the same and you will have to do the same things during the install anyway.

Lets begin:

Insert the Slackware Linux CD-ROM into the CD-ROM drive of the machine you are installing on and turn it off. Wait a few seconds and then turn the machine on. You will see some text coming up and asking you to type something at a boot: prompt.

Most people can safely ignore this and just hit ENTER on your keyboard. After this point you will see various lines of text scrolling and then you will come to a prompt asking for you to enter a keyboard map.

If you are using a US keyboard, just ignore this and hit enter. If you need to enter another keyboard map, or want a real challenge, press the 1 key on your number pad and hit ENTER.

After that screen you come to another prompt asking you to log in as root. Just type root and press enter. The root password is a random string of numbers and letters during the install. After logging in as root, you come to a command line.

Most people at this point are probably thinking what the hell is this bullshit? well, at this prompt, type cfdisk and hit the ENTER key.

After you are in cfdisk you will see all partitions on your HD. Use the left and right arrow keys to select options at the bottom of the screen, and the up and down arrow keys to select partitions.

If you have only one partition on the disk, hit the left arrow key, the hit enter to delete it. If you have two partitions, do the same and then hit the down arrow key to select the second partition, hit the right arrow key so highlight delete, and hit the ENTER key.

You should now have nothing but free space showing. Hit the right arrow key and press enter to create a new partition. Press the right arrow key again and select Logical and press enter. This is going to be your swap space, so enter in how many MB you want it too be.

The box I am installing on has 384 MB of RAM and I am making a swap space 1001 MB in size. After you type in how many MB you want, press enter. You should now see another option asking for Beginning End Cancel It auto highlights on beginning and that is what we want. So just hit enter. Putting swap at the beginning of your HD is good because its usually the faster part and therefore makes a good swap space.

After you hit enter, you should be back at where we started partitioning. Press the down arrow key and select the free space. Hit the right arrow key and press enter to create a new partition. This time, we are going to select Primary as the option. It also reselects this option so just press enter.

For size in MB I am going to just press enter because it lists how many MB you have left on the disk by default. Now you are back at the same screen again. By using the up and down arrow keys, highlight the logical partition we made first, and then hit the right arrow key until Type is highlighted. It is about 6 times you hot the arrow key until you get to the option Type.

After you have it highlighted, press enter. Press any key and it should say Enter file system type and it has 82 listed already, so press enter here. 82 is the swap space file system type. You are now returned to the menu again. Press the down arrow key and highlight the other partition. The one that is NOT listed as swap is what we want to highlight.

After you have highlighted the non swap partition, press the right arrow key 6 times. You should have Type highlighted again. Press enter when you have highlighted Type at the bottom of the screen.

You are now back at the screen saying press a key to continue. Press a key. Now for this part, you are NOT going to use 82 as the file system type. Type 83 as the file system type and press enter.

You are now back at the main cfdisk screen again. Press enter again to make the Linux partition bootable.

You see Boot appear near it.

Now, press the right arrow key 8 times to highlight Write on the bottom of the screen and press enter.

The computer will beep at you which scares the shit out of newbies.

You see the message designed to make Slackware only installed by Linux gurus. And a warning saying it can destroy data on your disk. Since we are formatting it and installing only slack, this message means jack shit.

Now, type Yes exactly as I did. You have to type yes with a capitol Y or it will bitch and say No, type Yes. So just save yourself a minute of laughing and type Yes.

After pressing enter it will beep as it writes all of this to the partition table of your HD. Then it will beep again when it is done.

Now you should be back at the cfdisk main screen again. Press the right arrow key 5 times to highlight Quit and press enter.

You are now back at a command prompt. You should see:

root@slackware:/#

At this command prompt, type setup and hit the enter key.

Root@slackware:/# setup

Your screen gets as graphical as it is going to get during this install.

You see numerous options.

Press the down arrow key 2 times to highlight add swap and press enter.

You come to another screen with more options. It will say Slackware has detected a swap partition:

Arent you glad we made that swap file?

It will ask if you want to install this as your swap partition. Press enter as it is already highlighted on Yes.

It formats the swap partition and checks for bad blocks. Go get yourself some coffee as this will take a few minutes even on fast systems.

After it finishes it goes to the next screen saying your swap has been configured. Press enter.

Now your at another screen. You see your Linux partition we made in the cfdisk program. Press enter on this screen to Select it.

After pressing enter, you are taken to a screen with a few options. Using the up and down arrow keys will navigate you through all of this. You can just press enter here and do a quick format, or you can select Check, and allow it to check the entire disk for bad blocks.

Do NOT select No.

Choose whatever the hell you want here. If your in a hurry or just want this to end, select format. If you have time to kill and or want your disk checked for bad blocks, select Check. After selecting which option you want to go with, press enter to actually select them. After you choose which option you are going with, you see another screen asking for the file system to use.

If youre an old school user you will probably be choosing ext2, if you are like me, you will be choosing either ext3 or reiserfs because I like my file system to be a journaling file system.

The main differences in these 3 file systems are:

Ext2: an old file system that has been around for quite a while. Ext2 became less important as journaling file systems came to be. Journaling file systems allow fast recovery, Ext2 does not. But, Ext2 has been around for a number of years, and has undergone a lot of tests and improvements, making it fairly stable and reliable. Also, Ext2 allows easy upgrading to Ext3.

Ext3: Ext3 file system was based on Ext2, so a lot of things have carried over. Ext3 however is a journaling file system, so it allows fast recovery and so on. Ext3 is a good file system with good performance.

ReiserFS: ReiserFS was available as a kernel patch for SuSE Linux users using the 2.2.x kernel. ReiserFS offers better disk utilization, better disk performance, and fast crash recovery.

I selected ReiserFS here. After you select and press enter, it formats the file system, and then takes you to another screen. Just press enter here. It is just a page saying it added this to /etc/fstab.

Now you select where to install Slackware from. Since I am using a CD-ROM, I press enter with the number 1 highlighted.

After pressing enter, you come to another screen. Just press enter with auto selected. You come to another screen where it scans for the Slackware install media. After this, you are taken to a screen to select software you want to install.

Use the up and down arrow keys to move around, and press SPACEBAR to select or unselect options. Most of the reselected options should be left alone as some are system files you need.

After you have selected what you want there, press enter.

You are taken to a new screen where you can select what you want here. If you want everything, press enter. This will install everything and is fairly easy to finish up with.

I am gore however. So I am selecting expert.

After selecting expert, you are taken to more screen thats allow you to select individual packages.

Using the up and down arrow keys again, select the software you would like to install, using the SPACEBAR key to select and deselect software. Again, most of the pre selected things should be left alone.

Something things, like PCMCIA may be unselected as I am not installing this on a laptop. After you have selected the software you want, press enter. After you have pressed enter, you are taken to another similar screen to select more software.

Select whatever you want too add in this category of software and press enter. After you press enter, you are brought to yet another screen of software selection. After you have selected the software you want in this screen, press enter.

After pressing enter, you are brought to a smaller screen to select some versions of Emacs. Besides the ones already selected, I recommend you select Emacs-nox. This will allow you to run Emacs without having X loaded.

After you have selected what you want here, press enter.

After pressing enter, you are brought to an even smaller selection screen. These are help documents, just press enter as they are useful and should be kept.

After pressing enter, you are brought to an even smaller selection screen. This allows you to select the Linux source. You probably should leave this here too unless you are installing on an incredibly small HD.

Press enter when finished with this screen. After pressing enter, you are brought to a bigger software selection screen. These are libraries and should be left alone. Press enter.

After pressing enter you are brought to a similar screen to select networking programs. I recommend selecting fetch mail so you can check your email without loading X, and Nmap.

After you have selected what you want in here, press enter.

After pressing enter, you are brought to another screen for software selection. Unless you are a publisher I dont think youll need to select much here, just press enter.

After pressing enter, you are brought to another software selection screen. Most of this you wont need to add either. So you can safely leave this screen alone and press enter.

After pressing enter, you are brought to another software selection screen. This is for Xfree86. Dont unselect any of this unless you dont plan in running X at all.

After you have finished with this screen, press enter. After pressing enter, you are brought to another screen for more software.

These are X applications. If you are not going to use a GUI, you wont need any of this, but most people will probably want a GUI, so dont deselect any of this unless you are not running X.

After you have made your selections, press enter so you can be dragged through another damned screen of selection. Dont worry though, this one is short. Just press enter unless you are tight on disk size.

If you have a little disk, you dont NEED these, so you can deselect it =)

After pressing enter, you finally can stop selecting packages while the ones we just spent the last 20 minutes selecting are installed.

During this time, feel free to get coffee as it can take a while. Or you could wire money to me.

After a while your CD-ROM drive will open and ask for the second CD-ROM. Slackware 9.1 was the first Slackware to have 2 CD-ROMs. So grab the second CD-ROM and stick it in.

After you have stuck the second CD-ROM in, press enter.

After pressing enter you are brought to another software selection. After selecting the GNOME packages you want, press enter so you can be pushed into another software selection screen for KDE.

After selecting those packages, press enter again. After pressing enter, the software you just selected will be installed.

After they install, you are taken to a new screen to install the Linux kernel. If you installed like I did with a CD-ROM, just select CD-ROM, which should already be selected, and press enter.

If you used a boot disk, select that.

After pressing enter, you are taken to another page to choose the kernel. The one that is already selected, /cdrom/kernels/bare.I/bzImage, should be fine, so just press enter. After you press enter, it installs the kernel and then takes you to another screen.

If you want to make a boot disk, press enter. If you dont, press the down arrow key and then press the right arrow key to select skip this, and then press enter.

After pressing enter, you select your modem. I dont have a modem installed on this computer because it is hooked up to my LAN using a NIC. So for this screen, I will be selecting no modem.

If you have a modem, select it. After you press enter, you are taken to a screen to enable hot plugging. Yes is already selected, so just press enter.

After you press enter, you are taken to a screen where you select how to install LILO. Simple is already selected here, and this usually works fine, so just press enter.

After you press enter, you are taken to a screen where the console settings are chosen. For this, I am selecting 1024x768x256. This should work fine on most machines, but if you are installing on older hardware, select the one at the top named standard.

After selecting one, press enter. You are then taken to another screen to pass parameters to the kernel. You usually wont need this so just press enter.

After pressing enter, you select where to install LILO. If you are dual booting, or using a boot manager, select Root, if you want to have to use a floppy for extra physical security, select floppy, if you are like me and not doing any of that, select MBR by pressing the down arrow key 2 times, and then pressing enter.

After pressing enter, you are taken to a screen to select a mouse.

Select your mouse and press enter.

After selecting a mouse, you are taken to another screen. Just press enter here as this can be a useful feature.

After pressing enter, you are taken to a screen to configure your network. If you have DSL or Cable, you probably want to do this now. If you have dial up, you probably wont need this.

Select yes or no and press enter. If you selected yes to configure the net, you are taken to a screen for a host name. Unless your installing this on a server or something where a lot of people will be accessing the machine, you can just make something up. If you are installing on a server, enter the hostname.

After entering a host name, press enter. After pressing enter, you enter the domain name. Again, you can pretty much make up whatever the hell you want here. Unless of course you are installing on a server as said before.

If you are installing on a server, enter the required information, and press enter. After you press enter, you are taken to a screen where you can set up how you get an IP. Since I have a LAN, I select DHCP. After you make your selection, press enter.

After pressing enter, you come to another screen asking for networking information. Unless you have an ISP run by nazis you can just press enter. After pressing enter, you will be shown your networking information. If it looks good, press enter, if it doesnt, press the right arrow key to highlight No, and press enter.

If you selected No, you will be taken back through the networking set up. If you selected yes, you are taken to an area where you select what services to run. Unless people need to access your machine remotely, deselect SSHd at the very bottom. Sendmail is ok though. That way you can send mail from a command line.

After selecting what services to run, press enter. After pressing enter, you are asked if you would like to try custom screen fonts. No is already reselected here, so press enter, unless you really want to try screen fonts out.

After pressing enter, you are taken to another damned screen. Unless you are sure, press enter. No is already highlighted here, and is a safe option.

You are now taken to a screen to select your time zone. I live in Michigan, so I am going to select US/MICHIGAN. After you highlight your time zone, press enter. After pressing enter, you are asked to select which Window Manager to run by default. Select whichever one you want and press enter. After pressing enter, you are taken to another screen telling you how you havent chosen a root password yet.

Select yes here, and press enter. After pressing enter, you see a prompt to enter a password. This is going to be your root password. Dont use anything you can find in a dictionary, or something someone would be able to guess. Make it hard to remember for everyone except you.

After you enter it, you have to enter it again to be sure you didnt fuck up any spelling. After you enter the password, it changes and you can now press enter like the prompt is telling you to do.

Now you are at a screen that should have you almost hugging me; The set up is complete screen. Press enter here. After pressing enter, you are taken back to that set up main screen. Use the down arrow key to highlight exit, and press enter.

You see a message saying installation of Slackware is complete, and your CD-ROM tray opens up and spits out the CD-ROM. Put the CD-ROMs away and close your CD-ROM drive. You are now at a command prompt again.

Type reboot and press enter. Your system restarts, and you are done.

Type to start GUI/desktop

startx
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