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I am 42 year old male returning to college fall 2013 to get an AS degree. Previous work experience I have is electronic / computer bench technician. I am going to major in
1. c# application development - to be a programmer
2. Network Administration - network administrations or
3. Computer Engineering Technology - advanced computer electronics PCB technician

I am a quite, shy person and need to know what work environment would be best for a person who is quite and shy and requires the least amount of teamwork, more of an individual effort.

As far as working as a computer bench technician I had to talk only a little bit. if I didnt have to talk I didn't and worked more as an individual. This really didnt hurt my work because work required fixing a set number of computers more production based.

From what I've seen of entry level programmer when I was a mail clerk they didn't do to much talking. Just coding in a cubicle. This I can handle. Seems more of an individual effort which I have apptitude for. When is there a lot of cummunicating for programmers? I am sure there is a part of the job process that require some communicating.

From what Ive seen in Network Administration when I was a mail clerk they usually sit in a room together. When somthing need fixing one or a group whent to hotspot to fix problem. This seems like much more teamwork and interpersonal skills involved which is my weakness. Also Ive seen network admins work in a room with a glass window where everyone can walk by and stare at them. This would make me very self concious rather then compfortable in a cubicle.

Please give me more input, thanks for your time and expertise.

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Last Post by AranTomoy
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Which require stronger social skills Programmer or Network Administration

Having done both, I'd say suck it up and work on your social skills, or find a different field. In all seriousness, social skills are needed as either a programmer or a network admin. If you don't have them and have no intention of developing them, you'll have a very hard time being successful.

From what I've seen of entry level programmer when I was a mail clerk they didn't do to much talking. Just coding in a cubicle.

It may seem that way, especially in organizations that don't do things like pair programming, but communication is paramount unless you're the only programmer and the only client for a project.

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Well said!
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I was once like you but i landed on a customer service job that was paying me just what i wanted at that time and i had to transform myself to communicating, i still find problems in innitiating conversations with people but am getting used so i would like to encourage you to start believing in yourself and you should know that shyness is not a desease it is your mind that is telling yoi that, actualy i have realised that shy people are more clever than talkative people becouse we are problem solvers so i have used this to get on top of everyone becouse as i talk now anyone who needs help with there computers they have to contact me so just believe in yourself and know you are always better than anyone you will get used just start communicating and give it time. I was awrded best employee of Feburaly 2013 in my company but just immagine someone who started so shy and could not look people in the eyes while talking in just 6months i imploved that much and even people have spent 5 years without being awrded but they are so straight forward and talkative. just try to do what you want i know it is posible

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Entry-Level IT, sometimes it is not so much about believing in yourself as it is about deflating the intimidation bubble of the person talking to you.

The next time you find it difficult to speak to someone, take a moment to size up their defiiciencies and then speak. You may find he or she seems a lot less intimidating thereafter.

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