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Hello

I am making a shopping cart where database I like to use is oracle but there are other projects which are already made with sqlserver2000 database & maybe I have to link from shopping cart to sqlserver2000 database where lots of contents are stored so what happens if I use oracle. Is there going to be any clash?

Awaiting reply at the earliest.

Thanking in advance.

Regards
Paresh

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Last Post by Paladine
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Hello

I am making a shopping cart where database I like to use is oracle but there are other projects which are already made with sqlserver2000 database & maybe I have to link from shopping cart to sqlserver2000 database where lots of contents are stored so what happens if I use oracle. Is there going to be any clash?

Awaiting reply at the earliest.

Thanking in advance.

Regards
Paresh

What web server are you running? If it's IIS on Windows, life will be much simplier if you go with SQL 2000.

Isn't licensing a concern? Sounds to me that Oracle would cost more. MSDE is free...if you don't anticipate your DB growing bigger than 2GB, it's a good alternative to SQL2000.

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web server is tomcat & programming is done thru jsp, servlet & other java technology. So which database is best?

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web server is tomcat & programming is done thru jsp, servlet & other java technology. So which database is best?

Oracle has tighter java integration... and if licensing is not an issue, Oracle sounds like the logical choice. However, I'm sure it'll take a person of more technical knowledge to maintain an Oracle db...

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Oracle has tighter java integration... and if licensing is not an issue, Oracle sounds like the logical choice. However, I'm sure it'll take a person of more technical knowledge to maintain an Oracle db...

Actually that is sort of true. Oracle is only a little bit trickier to setup, but will more than do the job well! I would go with Oracle myself (infact I run both SQL and Oracle... don't ask why :confused: ) , but you must understand a critical difference between them.


SQL uses T-SQL and Oracle uses PL/SQL. Similar but different. Like a spoon and fork being different. Both are items used for eating, but not equally as well for some foods. Meaning, some T-SQL statements will not work in PL/SQL. And remember ": " can be a huge pain!

:D

Hope this helps

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