Hello,


What I've learnt so far is in this order:

Hello world>>data types>>conditional execution>>C-style arrays>>C-style strings>>loops>>functions>>structs>>classes

I'm not very good at structs and classes and haven't tried any problems, just read it from the book. I find classes kinda difficult and often forget what I read yesterday:-/ Should I move on to other topics(?), if so, which ones come next ?
Thank You.

Don't just Read books..do practice them...& try to make some tiny programs on our own....

Yep! and I want to know what should be coming next in this list
Hello world>>data types>>conditional execution>>C-style arrays>>C-style strings>>loops>>functions>>structs>>classes

??

> what should be coming next in this list
> Hello world>>data types>>conditional execution>>C-style arrays>>C-style
> strings>>loops>>functions>>structs>>classes
templates, perhaps?

> That book is very costly, and not available in any library near me
Thinking in C++ 2nd Edition by Bruce Eckel is pretty ok and is available as a free e-book.
http://www.mindview.net/Books/TICPP/ThinkingInCPP2e.html

Well, I guess you could write your own little program, like tetris or something using classes and functions! From my experience, the best combination is reading books and then doing examples that come with the book, then modifying those examples to see what you can come up with. That way you undestand how and why things work.

Problem #1:

I'm not very good at structs and classes and haven't tried any problems, just read it from the book.

Then you are not learning. All you're doing is reading which by itself is worthless. Start at the beginning of the book and do the work after you read the text. That's the only way you can learn programming -- by doing.

And just follow the book in order. Don't jump around. If you don't like the book you have, find one you like. As you already tried, check your library.

My advice isn't much different than the others. I wouldn't be worried about what's next. If you don't have other experience in programming, what you have listed is a lot of cover. There is much more to those things than you probably realize.

You should practice writing programs with the things you have learned. This will lead you to learning the new things that you'll need to create your programs.

Just reading a book and knowing the language isn't what's important. You need to learn how to use the language to do what you want. That's the challenge and something you'll always be working on improving.

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