I know that frets on fire was made with python, but a question i have had was whenever you save something in python idle it is a .py, and you cant run them unless you have python (and if they do, they can just edit your program)
installed, but how did frets on fire make theirs an exe.

Thanks, its exactly what im looking for. But i need help getting it to work. I looked at their tutorial page, but it would be much better if they had a downloadable example. If someone could make a really quick example that would be a big help. Thanks

I think vegaseat had this posted some time ago, read the comments for instructions:

# Py2Exe version 0.6.3 setup file for console programs.
#
# If this is a windows GUI application replace the last line with
# windows = [{"script": 'myFile.py'}] )
#
# Enter the file name of your own .py code file in the last line,
# lets say it's test1.py
# so the last line should be: console = [{"script": 'test1.py'}] )
# then save this program as   p2e_test1.py  to the same directory 
# where your code file is located.
#
# Now run p2e_test1.py ...
#
# Two subfolders will be created, called  build and  dist.
# The dist folder contains your .exe file, MSVCR71.dll and 
# w9xpopen.exe (needed for os.popen() only)
# Your .exe file contains your byte code, all needed modules and
# the Python interpreter.
# The MSVCR71.dll can be distributed, but is often already in the 
# system32 folder.
# The build folder can be deleted.

from distutils.core import setup
import py2exe
import sys

# no arguments
if len(sys.argv) == 1:
    sys.argv.append("py2exe")

# creates a standalone .exe file, no zip files
setup( options = {"py2exe": {"compressed": 1, "optimize": 2, "ascii": 1, "bundle_files": 1}},
       zipfile = None,
       # replace myFile.py with your own code filename here ...
       console = [{"script": 'myFile.py'}] )

If I remembered right, there are some working sample setup.py's (console app, gui app, windows services app, etc.) installed with py2exe.

Take a look into py2exe's directory, you might find something really helpful.

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