Hi guys!
I have started learning geometry and wrote a code to calculate the distance between a line(or a segment) and a point.
Here is my code:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int dot_pdt(int a[],int b[],int c[])
{
    int ab[2],bc[2];
    
    ab[0]=b[0]-a[0];
    ab[1]=b[1]-a[1];
    
    bc[0]=c[0]-b[0];
    bc[1]=c[1]-b[1];
   // printf("%d\n",(ab[0]*bc[0]+ab[1]*bc[1]));
    return (ab[0]*bc[0]+ab[1]*bc[1]);
}

int cross_pdt(int a[],int b[],int c[])
{
    int ab[2],ac[2];
    
    ab[0]=b[0]-a[0];
    ab[1]=b[1]-a[1];
    
    ac[0]=c[0]-a[0];
    ac[1]=c[1]-a[1];
    //printf("%d\n",(abs)(ab[0]*ac[1]-ab[1]*ac[0]));
    return (abs)(ab[0]*ac[1]-ab[1]*ac[0]);
}

double distance(int a[],int b[])
{
    int d1=b[0]-a[0];
    int d2=b[1]-a[1];
    //printf("%f\n",sqrt(d1*d1+d2*d2));
    return (abs)(sqrt(d1*d1+d2*d2));
}

double linepointdist(int a[],int b[],int c[],int isSegment)
{
    double dist=cross_pdt(a,b,c)/distance(a,b);
    printf("%f\n",dist);
    int d1,d2;
    //If the problem is not a line but a segment.
    if(isSegment)
    {
        d1=dot_pdt(a,b,c);
        if(d1>0){printf("1\n"); return distance(b,c);}
        
        d2=dot_pdt(b,a,c);
        if(d2>0){printf("2\n"); return distance(a,c);}
    }
    return dist;
}

int main()
{
    int a[2],b[2],c[2];
    
    scanf("%d %d %d %d %d %d",&a[0],&a[1],&b[0],&b[1],&c[0],&c[1]);
    
	printf("%f",linepointdist(a,b,c,1));	
    
	return 0;
}

the problem is what I get is always an integer not a float value.
I have a input of

0 0 1 2 0 3

I get

1.000000

instead of

1.500000

The bug might be silly but its killing me.:'(
PLZ HELP.

Hi guys!
I have started learning geometry and wrote a code to calculate the distance between a line(or a segment) and a point.

Rewrite your distance function like this:

double distance(int a[],int b[])
{
    double d1=b[0]-a[0];
    double d2=b[1]-a[1];    
    return sqrt(d1*d1+d2*d2);
}

General rule -- if you do something with floating point, do everything with floating point. Implicit type casts works (as usual in C) in strange inpredictable manner.

Thanx Tilir I found the bug at last
It was in :

double distance(int a[],int b[])
{
    double d1=b[0]-a[0];
    double d2=b[1]-a[1];
    //printf("%f\n",sqrt(d1*d1+d2*d2));
    return (abs)(sqrt(d1*d1+d2*d2));
}

I removed "abs" from

return (abs)(sqrt(d1*d1+d2*d2));

and whoa!!! it started working I think the "abs" function has some problem let me study about "abs" function first.....

> I think the "abs" function has some problem let me study about "abs" function first
1. Use fabs() if you want to use floats.
2. Think about it - sqrt() only returns positive numbers, so why do you need it?

Another general rule of thumb:

If you think one of the standard libraries has problems, look at your code again. These libraries are subject to a lot of scrutiny. I'm not saying that there is no possibility of errors in them - it's just much MUCH more likely that

a) you're not using it correctly IE putting an integer value into a function instead of a pointer.

b) it doesn't do what you think it does IE you think its returning something that it isn't.

c) you've got some other coding issue.

Implicit type casts works (as usual in C) in strange inpredictable manner.

Since inpredictable is not a word, I assume you mean unpredictable. The problem with this statement is that casts are completely predictable.

Can you give us an example that is strange and unpredictable?

Since inpredictable is not a word, I assume you mean unpredictable. The problem with this statement is that casts are completely predictable.

Can you give us an example that is strange and unpredictable?

int i = 5;
double d = i / 2; // expecting d = 2.5, but... division is integer. i / 2.0 will be correct.
printf("%f\n", d);

My lovely one (not about floating point, but...)

unsigned int a = 13;
if (a < -1)
  printf("%s", "Wow!"); // Surprise. Unsigned to signed promotion works. ((int) a < -1) will be correct

Really I'm agree with you -- any of these are completely predictable after styding the standard and some time, spend programming on C. They are unintuitive to novice, that is what I mentioned.

Anyone may read excellent book on C language by Harbison and Steele where the most of such pitfalls are collected. But show me someone who cares...

Why do you call this a pitfall? They are just general rules in evaluating expressions, Aren't they?
I just can't thing of any other way to evaluate these expression.
for (5 < -1u) the compiler is bound to return 1.

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.