Can someone run my code template to see what's wrong?

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[ ])
{ 

int a = 40;		            //No. of hrs worked during week
float b = 12.75;       		//Pay rate: dollars per hour
float c = 510;              //Weekly wages
cout << a * b;
cout << c;

// read in the hours worked

cout << endl;
cout << "Number of hours worked during the week (integer) = "; 
int hours_worked;

// read in the pay rate

cout << "Hourly pay rate (specify two digits after the decimal point) = ";
float pay_rate;

// compute wages

float weekly_wages;

// display the result

cout << endl;
float 510 << wages << endl;

return (0); // terminate with success

}

First wrap your code in code tags .

Now this line float 510 << wages << endl; makes no sense whatsoever. You do realize that "<<" needs to be prepened by an object of the class ostream, not a variable of type float or a constant. If you want to display the wages it should be something like cout << "The wages are " << wages << endl; And your code is not reading any input values in anywhere !! how do you expect it to compute the wages ? And you've defined your variable as "weekly_wages" yet you are trying to output a variable called "wages" which is not even declared anywhere.

Here are some basics

#include <iostream>

using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

int main(){
  int hours;

  // ask the user for an input
  cout << "How many hours have you worked? " << endl; 
  // read the number of hours worked
  cin >> hours;  
  
  // display the value read 
  cout << " You have worked " << hours << " hours" << endl; 

  return 0;
}
I know this is simple, but this is my first time. I'm having a tough time understanding. Can someone walk me though the code? Please

Well then start with something basic. Here is a tutorial that explains how "cin" and "cout" can be used for I/O.

Here is another tutorial. I would suggest reading the C++ Basics part, which should cover most of what you are attempting to do.

And code tags are only for your code.

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