So school's out for a month and Ive been doing some hobby VB6 programming...

Im writing calculators involving up to 25 variables, many constants, etc, etc, etc..

So, instead of requiring the user to input all the vars I thought I'd allow the loading of comma- or tab-delineated textfiles with appropriate values already there for particular cases.

For instance, to calculate the concentration of an organic acid in equilibrium with X other species in solution of X unknowns at, say, standard temp and pressure; all the user would have to do is load that file and input one or two values. Additionally, I would like to allow for saiving the file if the user wanted to change the inputs for compund- or solution-specific, non-ideal conditions...

So can you all recommend a simple tutorial that will discuss the process of how to load/save the files?

TIA!:)
-gkd

Dont know about VB but for PB for windows it should be easy
open filename$ for binary as #1
get$ #1,lof(1),info$
numberoffields&=parsecount(info$)
dim myarray$(numberoffields&)
for k&=1 to numberoffields&:myarray$(k&)=parse$(info$,k&):next:close #1
something like that (default of parse is comma delimiter)

Hi

Before you ask for any help in VB
Check this first always
http://msdn.microsoft.com/
and search there
I have always found that this site gives answers to most microsoft related queries
If you dont find what you need PM me i will send across a sample as to how to save to text files

yni420

Er...um. :o

Sorry for the stupid thread. I developed a realy cool solution to my problem that reads each value from a CSV by splitting the string and then appends the file onthefly ('kind of') to a temp file, for which a new CSV line is written everytime the program goes through 10 iterations of the calculation, then at the end of the routine reads the final values (last lin) from the temp file which are written into the the app and then optionally saved into original file and stored as the resultant theoretical solution properties.

Im working on a method to compare this to lab measured values now.

thanks for all your help.

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