Hey guys,

I just want to know if its possible to code a java program that will automatically logs you on your online accounts (e.g. such as yahoo mail, facebook, gmail, multiply, or even in this site) using your own username and password you use to register on such accounts. If its possible, what codes or technique should I use?

Hey guys,

I just want to know if its possible to code a java program that will automatically logs you on your online accounts (e.g. such as yahoo mail, facebook, gmail, multiply, or even in this site) using your own username and password you use to register on such accounts. If its possible, what codes or technique should I use?

And why would you ever want to do this?

And why would you ever want to do this?

I just need a little help in doing a project which will automatically logs a user in his online accounts.. even in his emails only. Also, it keeps a users online usernames and passwords just in case he forgot his account information.

Hmm, to do something like this in Java I'd assume that you would have to create code to handle these kind of problems--


Potential Pseudocode

-At startup, run program and have a thread that constantly checks if you have a web browser running such as FireFox or Internet Explorer, and in addition constantly check which website the user is currently browsing.
-IF user accesses <insert website here>
    -Parse remote file (the web page) for the link to sign into
    -push data into the link to sign in as last user to sign in (of course
     you would have a data file with this information stored somewhere on your computer)

-Else do nothing

of course you dont have to run the program at start-up, but it would be nice if it was an automatic thing you didn't have to run on your own.

And of course the problem might be more complicated than this. Suppose you're already logged into yahoo.com and you access the site again. You don't want to waste time parsing the file for information if you already have a session ID associated with your personal info. It might cause problems.

I'm just rambling though, so forgive me.

Also, it keeps a users online usernames and passwords just in case he forgot his account information.

All modern browsers (= all today's browsers) have something like a password manager which will safely guard that information for you and fill it in automatically for you when you visit that particular web page again, the only thing left is that you have to click the logon button :P

Hmm, to do something like this in Java I'd assume that you would have to create code to handle these kind of problems--


Potential Pseudocode

-At startup, run program and have a thread that constantly checks if you have a web browser running such as FireFox or Internet Explorer, and in addition constantly check which website the user is currently browsing.
-IF user accesses <insert website here>
    -Parse remote file (the web page) for the link to sign into
    -push data into the link to sign in as last user to sign in (of course
     you would have a data file with this information stored somewhere on your computer)

-Else do nothing

of course you dont have to run the program at start-up, but it would be nice if it was an automatic thing you didn't have to run on your own.

And of course the problem might be more complicated than this. Suppose you're already logged into yahoo.com and you access the site again. You don't want to waste time parsing the file for information if you already have a session ID associated with your personal info. It might cause problems.

I'm just rambling though, so forgive me.

Its okay,, any idea would be appreciated, so thank you :)

what i have in mind is to have a normal program with buttons, menus, etc. which can add, edit, and delete user's online accounts and the automatic login feature. it has other features too but i'll do it part by part :)

you could pre program the info into a class using the robot api. Though your computer would be unusable while it's running. That'd be easy to do...as long as resolutions are not changing.

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