Hi all,

My first post here, but long time troller.
I was looking for a GUI platform to develop on and couldn't decide between wxPython, PyQT and/or IronPython or Jython.
I decided to go with wxPython after getting a couple of headaches elsewhere.
I'd really like a quick IDE to build GUI on, so I first tested out PyQT, and it gave me lots of installation issues. I first tried to download the source and install it on a 2.6x version of Python but realized that PyQT only worked on a 2.5 version for the binaries. Then I installed 2.5 and still got issues; see the image below. Code generation fail.

My feeling is that PyQT is not as well supported as the other bindings/modules.

To me, if something works well ... you should just be able to open it up run it ... and bang ... it works straight away. Like an iPhone or something ... the fact that you have to sort out all these packages and work around all these installs is a pain the ass really. so i decided not to go with PyQT.

I went to this site here also: http://www.awaretek.com/toolkits.html
to help you decide which gui toolkit was most suitable. for me, ease of use, documentation and popularity was most important ... and it kept showing wxPython as the most ideal solution for me.
I use python for making productivity apps, and writing robust programs with little code and speed is of utmost importance. therefore going with something which has lots of support and documentation is important as well. not sure on the facts, but wxPython is one of the most, if not THE most supported gui toolkits available.

i guess just doing gui via pure coding is okay if you cut and paste, not that long really, especially if youre coding on python.

anyways ... one thing i found out about these gui toolkit ide's was that they don't support all the sorts of form and widget libraries that are available. and that wxPython has a greater/larger library.
I was working with PyQT and they didn't even have a toolbar in the IDE GUI toolkit ... see the second attached image below.

So that sux. As guido von rosso (i think that's his name) said ... wxPython is probably the best out there right now if you're not afraid to code.

Furthermore, there is a greater ability to customize if you're building GUI at the code level.

Besides, there is a large community base out there for wx, and lots of documentation ... and best thing of all ... wxpython just works!!! i got a dialogue with menus and toolbars up and running in about 1 hour and able to view the code and all ... whereas all the other toolkits took longer ... at least a couple of hours and even a day or more with some.

I will try out Jython and IronPython. However my concerns about these two pathways is that they don't support specific modules/packages on their platforms that are workable on Python 2.6+ ... for example ... I use the win32com packages so that I can access msft office objects ... i'm not sure whether a piece of code that has a bit of python, a bit of visual basic and a bit of java in it would compile and run properly and whether there are cross platform issues.

Is ironpython hard to work? i was trying compile the code and run it but the way in which you do it seemed primitive ... you had to specify the path directory of the python interpreter each time as well as the project file location.

so at the end of the day ... wxpython was the one for me.

If anyone has any tips on whether there are alternatives on how to produce rapid fast GUI's that offer advanced features and documentation/support please let me know. I'm open to alternatives.

Cheers.

Attachments codegenerationfail.jpg 71.42 KB toolbar-pythonGUI.jpg 9.83 KB

The only blemish I can see with wxPython is that it will not work with Python3 at the moment.

PyQT works with Python3, but may have licensing problems down the road.

Tkinter is pretty much cross platform and comes with Python2 and Python3. Its widgets are rather basic and look a little homely on a Windows machine, but look great on Apple's OS.

Ironpython 2.6 is a close equivalent of Python 2.6 with the added advantage of having access to CLR and the MS .NET Framework. It can use the Framework's library as a GUI toolkit. For a good example see:
http://www.daniweb.com/forums/post1104553.html#post1104553

Edited 6 Years Ago by vegaseat: ip

Comments
after all someone spoke about the version issues..

The only blemish I can see with wxPython is that it will not work with Python3 at the moment.

True, that turns me down, haven't even tried to mess with Py3k

PyQT works with Python3, but may have licensing problems down the road.

There is Nokia Project that is interesting. I heard from wxPy mailing list

Tkinter is pretty much cross platform and comes with Python2 and Python3. Its widgets are rather basic and look a little homely on a Windows machine, but look great on Apple's OS.

Haven't tried it. Don't know why it dosn't fit my brain. Have anythig changed from 2.x?

Ironpython 2.6 is a close equivalent of Python 2.6 with the added advantage of having access to CLR and the MS .NET Framework. It can use the Framework's library as a GUI toolkit.

Uh! I forgot that there are alot of classes in .Net farmework :)

Hi.
I have always used wx, but if you can't use it for any reason, you'll always have tkinter.
If your project is simple, you can use easygui, really easy to use an tkinter based.
For wx gui design, you can use Boa Constructor or wx-glade.
Have some options that will make your live easy:
python-card
dabo
And some others wx based.
Cheers.

I use wxPython + wxGlade. It lets me first focus on the design then I can worry about the code. Great for RAD!

I use wxPython + wxGlade. It lets me first focus on the design then I can worry about the code. Great for RAD!

If you use the SPE (Stani's Python Editor) IDE then wxGlade (also Blender) is integrated into that program.

If you use the SPE (Stani's Python Editor) IDE then wxGlade (also Blender) is integrated into that program.

I did not know that, I will have to check it out.

If you use the SPE (Stani's Python Editor) IDE then wxGlade (also Blender) is integrated into that program.

I tried to work SPE.
It didn't work for me. Program wouldn't execute.
For development, I'm on Windows XP by the way and Python 2.6.4.

Is there are catch?

I read some reviews and people have had problems with crashing when there's too much code and stuff.

Might stick to NetBeans, not unless there's a workaround for me to try out SPE.

Thanks anyways.

I tried to work SPE.
It didn't work for me. Program wouldn't execute.
For development, I'm on Windows XP by the way and Python 2.6.4.

Is there are catch?

I read some reviews and people have had problems with crashing when there's too much code and stuff.

Might stick to NetBeans, not unless there's a workaround for me to try out SPE.

Thanks anyways.

Never mind. I downloaded SPE on my Ubuntu machine.
The package installer on ubuntu integrated with SPE works like a charm.
Looks like a neat IDE. Will give it a shot, and see if it's worth moving over from Netbeans/Eclipse.
I like Jython, that's why I stay with Netbeans.

I heard some people that SPE doesn't work well with Pytho2.6
May be Ubuntu guys tweaked it a little. Check Wing IDE or Eclipse with Python plugin, Pydev

Never mind. I downloaded SPE on my Ubuntu machine.
The package installer on ubuntu integrated with SPE works like a charm.
Looks like a neat IDE. Will give it a shot, and see if it's worth moving over from Netbeans/Eclipse.
I like Jython, that's why I stay with Netbeans.

I use Linux Ubuntu on my Dell notebook, and use SPE and wxGlade for my quick wxPython designs. It does work very well. The nice thing about wxGlade is that it produces .py code directly. The code is not too ugly and is easily modified to make a working program. Still using Python 2.5.2 on that machine. But I know from friends that SPE works flawless with Python 2.6 (Windows XP).

Maybe you can give us a taste of Jython GUI code sometime.

Edited 6 Years Ago by sneekula: Jython

Every now and then I need to use Python26, so I installed it on a small USB flash drive. I used Portable Python from:
http://www.portablepython.com/releases/

The Portable Python26 version comes with the SPE IDE set for Python26, and I must say that it works just fine on either of my Windows XP machines. BTW, SPE is written with wxPython.

Edited 6 Years Ago by vegaseat: n/a

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