If you are using the webbrowser contol you have several choices in how to accomplish what you want, but since we do not know what you are using and the code you are using to attempt what you want, we are left in the dark...

Good Luck

If you are using the webbrowser contol you have several choices in how to accomplish what you want, but since we do not know what you are using and the code you are using to attempt what you want, we are left in the dark...

Good Luck

Nope actually, I want something like Firewall type. Just like firewall block unwanted requests to websites. IS there any similar thing possible in vB. If yes, then how?

Nope actually, I want something like Firewall type. Just like firewall block unwanted requests to websites. IS there any similar thing possible in vB. If yes, then how?

Visual Basic 6.0 only supports Single-threaded or Apartment-threaded objects. By default, ActiveX EXE projects are set to the Apartment threading model. Thus, a Visual Basic ActiveX EXE is subject to the rules that COM imposes on single-threaded apartment (STA) objects.
If an object that runs in an STA is called concurrently by multiple clients (regardless of their threading model), COM synchronizes access to the object by posting window messages to the component's message queue. As a result, the object only receives one call each time it retrieves and dispatches a COM-related message. :confused:

I know that some others have done various things like creating a webserver with vb6.0 so you might want to use your friends (yahoo, google, ask, answers, bing) and search for vb6 create firewall but I doubt you will find much as you would have to insert yourself between the application and the pipe and vb is really an application layer tool and not a system level or kernel level tool...

Good Luck

in my opinion it is too difficult to make this kind of application in VB6 too many things we have to do ourselves, because VB6 was developped when internet is still at early stages
in my experience VB6 tools is good as browser only

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.