Can anyone show me a sample program that can turn on a computer automatically on scheduled time..please show me so that i have an idea what it look like..

thnx ^_^

Interesting problem. If the computer is off, how do you execute a program?
Do you have a second computer that is running and an electronic connection between the two so that the second computer can turn on the first one?

Yeah, I learned one at Hogwartz last semester, you might want to ask my informatics teacher JK Rowlingus.

You do need a bootable wand, though :)

There MIGHT be something in the computer's hardward BIOS.
Also, there is something like "Wake on LAN" in there.
Of course, you would need another computer to "give it a nudge"!
But, as NormR1 says, if a computer is turned off... How can it run a program?

There are ways to turn on a computer remotely over a LAN (or even WAN) but they require specialised hardware as well as specialised control software.

The question btw reminds me of a time when a customer filed a bugreport and demanded we fix a piece of software so it'd keep running during a power failure...

Or just this on the power lead.
The programming is primitive to say the least, but hey, whatever.

Or go up a level and use some X10 kit. You'll also need a controller (and software) loaded onto your PC as well, but it could be fully automated at that point.

HI I think you can use shutdown command for windows , through your java application you can open cmd -you can open the cmd by object from class process - and write the shutdown command , i think it will work .

HI I think you can use shutdown command for windows , through your java application you can open cmd -you can open the cmd by object from class process - and write the shutdown command , i think it will work .

do you usually turn your computer on by running a shutdown command? never tried that before, I'll make sure to do so :D

Comments
Neat trick, eh? ;)

i tried it before it works fine , try it and tell me .

SHUTDOWN -S
TO RESTART SHUTDOWN -R
TO ABORT SHUTDOWN -A

I hope this help. :)

You could try doing this with some sort of Motor Control and a servo, though doing it with Java might be challening. I recently learned to program a type of robot with Java, and all that was using the Java Communications thing... you may be able to do it with that.

i tried it before it works fine , try it and tell me .

SHUTDOWN -S
TO RESTART SHUTDOWN -R
TO ABORT SHUTDOWN -A

I hope this help. :)

He is trying to turn on a computer not turn off. An idea, but it is not with programming.

Just make a 555 timer circuit and cat the timing correct (by placing multiple capacitors in series or increasing the resistance) and then make it run off of a battery so that every 24 hours it sends a current. Then hook it up so that it sends the current though the power button. Then the computer will turn on every 24 hours since the time you set it up (Assuming your battery never runs out. Then again you could just make an adapter). Anyways, this circuit is not that hard to make and it would accomplish the job assuming you know how much of a current you need to send through the power switch.

A quick circuit analysis

power button cables disconnected from button, connected to 2 sides of 555 (-,+)
555 running off of battery/ outlet
every 24 hours the capacitors fill up and release a charge though the wire (that were connected to the button) and then turn on the computer. After the charge is released the capacitors begin to fill up again and the cycle continues.

If you decide to go with this idea and need help I suggest you go to the PC hardware section under Hardware & software on this site.

Edited 5 Years Ago by sirlink99: n/a

Comments
Like your last senetence. Maybe the poster will see me at the hardware forum there. Lol

A reply to my previous post instead of making a 555 timer circuit you could just hook it up to an alarm clock and replace the alarm with the wires to the power button.

what if the server execute a program then the other computer will automatically on
what program is needed to do that?

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