hello! i m doing advance java now. and i m not getting any solid book for reference to read. actually, what i want in book is that it must have sample problem given with each concept! means it should be too explained. please refer a book from which i can get what i want! :-) thanks

that would depend on the topics handled in in your course.
also, you'll find examples in most books, but expecting a complete application as an example is a bit far fetched.

if you want to know about good books, I would recommend looking at the sticky thread on top of the Java forum, there you'll find recommendations for several good books, with explanations about why you should take a look at those books.

that would depend on the topics handled in in your course.
also, you'll find examples in most books, but expecting a complete application as an example is a bit far fetched.

if you want to know about good books, I would recommend looking at the sticky thread on top of the Java forum, there you'll find recommendations for several good books, with explanations about why you should take a look at those books.

which book will u refer for complete reference of advance java ?

there is no book for complete reference.
at this point, hibernate, spring, gwt, struts, and much (very much) more frameworks are considered widely used.
this however does not mean that every developer in java uses all (or even any, for that matter) of these frameworks.

it depends on the topics your course deals with. of most books, you can online take a look at the table of contents, which also might help you out.

myself, I've used Deitel & Deitel, the SCJP (Sun Certified Programmer for Java) 6 Study Guide, also by (among others) Kathy Sierra, I've also used Ivor Horton's Beginning Java 2 SDK 1.4 edition (of which I assume there will be new versions enough)

off course, I've also used books that are more going for a certain framework, or type of technique, GWT in action, for instance.

Now, all these books have their strong points, and all have their vices, but most of this depends on what you need to study and how far your teacher goes into details, so that's pretty hard for us to decide for you.

"Advanced Java" really doesn't mean anything. I'm guessing it's a class, something like my CS2 class, in which you're still going to be dealing with the ins and outs of the Java language. In other words, probably not looking at hibernate, spring or any of that stuff, and really only touching on the nuances of OO design. What they probably want is for you to make code that uses classes, interfaces, objects, and methods, without causing any syntax errors. For that, any book you've been assigned will probably work as well as the next, but if you can pick your own... Head First Java is an excellent choice.

If you're interested in self-improvement beyond the content of the course, I'd suggest Head First Design Patterns, which is a nice little intro to a grab bag of ideas you can use to structure your program sensibly. Be sure to read others' code as well -- reading code written by experts helps you understand how experts write code. You might move on to a framework like Spring or Hibernate, which I don't have any experience with, but have entire books written about them.

If a reference manual (i.e., a book for someone who already knows how to program in Java to look up details in from time to time) is really all you want, I've heard good things about Deitel & Deitel, but I don't have a copy myself. Java in a Nutshell might be good too; you rarely go wrong with O'Reilly. Keep in mind that Java is a large and complicated language; any more or less thorough reference manual will be of substantial size and have an extensive index.

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