And we desperately want to know what your problem is.
Don't mind the sarcasm, but seriously, you could include slightly more information with your post.

Thanks but the problem has already been solved :).....May I ask though are you by any chance a programmer?

Well actually there is I'd appreciate sooooo much if you could......Theres actually I'm really struggling to do a project that involves creating a database management system for a non profit organisation and also a graphical user Interface for the users to interact with the database.......Now the reason why I'm struggling is because our I.T teacher hardly taught any of us any database manipulation coding and he left to go teach in another school and not only is the WHOLE program database based it's due next week and I don't know a thing....... :(

While Slavi's answer is indeed a good starting point, I think we could help some more as well if you could give us some more information. Let's start with a few pertinent questions:

  • What operating system is this going to run on?
  • What database engine are you using (e.g., SqlLite, MS Access, MS-SQL, MySql, Postgres, Oracle, etc)?
  • What programming language (aside from SQL, which is nearly universal in DBMS querying) will you be using?
  • What are the Business Rules for the organization? Do you have enough information about the NPO to define the BRs?
  • What are the entities you need to have store and retrieve information about, and how are they related? What are the relevant attributes of the entities?
  • What relations - that is to say, tables - can you make to model the entities?

The starting point in most database design is defining a set of business rules, that is to say, a semi-formal description of what the organization is, what the structure of it is, and what it does. For example, some years ago I wrote the following business rules for a company I was designing a web site and database for:

Business Rules for MJTB

0) The primary business of MJTB is the processing of PURCHASE ORDERS from CUSTOMERS.
1) A PURCHASE ORDER is an agreement between MJTB and a CUSTOMER to exchange one or more ITEMS for an amount of money equal to the SALE TOTAL.
2) The SALE TOTAL of a PURCHASE ORDER is the amount of money exchanged by the CUSTOMER for a given PURCHASE ORDER, based on the PRICE of the ITEM, the SALES TAX for a given area, the SHIPPING COST, and any DISCOUNTS.
3) The PRICE of an ITEM is a fixed amount set by MJTB prior to a given PURCHASE ORDER.
4) The SALES TAX is an added amount payed to the local government based on the PRICE of the ITEMS sold.
5) The SHIPPING COST is the cost of SHIPPING one or more ITEMS to a DELIVERY ADDRESS given by a CUSTOMER at the time of the PURCHASE ORDER.
6) A STREET ADDRESS is a name for a physical location.
7) A DELIVERY ADDRESS is a STREET ADDRESS to which one or more ITEMS are SHIPPED for one or more PURCHASE ORDERS.
8) A DISCOUNT is an amount to be determined at the time of a PURCHASE ORDER by which the SALE TOTAL is reduced.
9) ITEMS are provided by SUPPLIERS.
10) One or more SUPPLIERS can be a SOURCE for a given type of ITEM.
11) A SUPPLIER has a SUPPLIER BUSINESS NAME, one or more CONTACT NAMES, a BUSINESS ADDRESS, an EMAIL ADDRESS, and a PHONE NUMBER.

You don't necessarily need to go into as much detail as this, though usually the more detail the better (up to a point, of course). The idea of writing out the business rules is to get a clear idea of what you are modeling with the database.

Edited 2 Years Ago by Schol-R-LEA

I don't think the operating system it's going to run on matters, the whole NPO thing was just baically a topic for the project.......I'm going to be using the deby database engine, as for the programming language that will be Java...The rest of the stuff like the business rules, entities, and relations I don't think I really have time to emphasize on, that's sorted out, It's just the coding for everything that I have designed which I'm Having a problem.......I'll keep you guys posted, besides I'm sure my level of work(Although I find it so difficult) would be a piece'a cake for you guys....Sorry for the late responses just that I stay In a completely different time zone.

You have Derby configured to work with your development tools, right? That probably means that it is going through JDBC, which makes for a nicely standard API. OK, then. What do you need help with?

Jup that JDBC looks familiar so I'm guessing yes and thank you soooooo much!!!!! but for now I'm going to complete the simple stuff which I know how to do, which is not much, then I'll let you know when you can help me with the easy stuff which you know how to do, If you catch my drift ;.......Looks like I'm going to have to pull an all nighter due to differences in time zones..catch ya later.

Ohkay So when I was designing my database in libre office I was able to incorporate the boolean data type into my database but now on the Derby platform I'm unable to do so...........

Finally We're on the same page with regards to the time....So basicall I'm going to have to use 1/0 values.

Well, technically, every data type is bit data, though not in any useful sense; I think you are confusing the terms 'bit' and 'byte'. No, what I mean is, BIT is the name of the data type in the tables.

How are you building the tables? Are you writing SQL CREATE commands directly, or using a tool for table generation? I'll show you how to create tables in SQL, but if you are generating them automatically, it may not be quite the same. I would recommend generating the tables programmatically anyway, as it gives you better control of the database, but I know it is a lot of work as well.

Comments
Helloooo anybody there??????!!!!!!

I'm building the tables using tools...And there isn't exactly a boolean data type for derby databases on the netbeans platform.

That doesn't make sense - it should be there, and called BIT. I'll look into it myself and find out what is going on.

OK, now that I can see what you are talking about, I can tell you that there is in fact a BOOLEAN option in the type pulldown, it just is off the lower edge of the menu. If you scroll down in the pulldown menu itself, you'll find it at the bottom. It is remarkably easy to miss, so don't fault yourself for it.

Edited 2 Years Ago by Schol-R-LEA

Take a look at this please because I don't see what I'm missing.The list doesn't go on from there.

Attachments data_types3.png 50.96 KB Data_types2.png 48.48 KB Data_types.png 50.48 KB

That's very strange. What version of Netbeans are you using? I just installed the newest version (8.0), which does indeed have Boolean, but if you have an older version it may not support it yet. I'd be surprised if that were the case, but it could be the source of the problem.

Just to make it clear that it is in fact appearing in Netbeans 8.0, this screenshot shows it as it should appear on your screen.

Attachments Ndetbeans-boolean-1.png 22.59 KB
This question has already been answered. Start a new discussion instead.