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I just bought a book C++ How to Program -Fifth Edition-

Written by: deitel & deitel;
for more info visit:www.deitel.com

Review from a customer of amazon:

I had always hated Deitel & Deitel's 'C++: How to program' iterations. I had always thought the book never quite lived up to its great potential because of its own ambition to be the best C++ textbook ever written. I had always thought the book was a terrible book not because of its contents, but how it presented them. I had also thought D & D were quite arrogant and obnoxious in terms of the rambling verbosity of translating their impressive knowledge into texts in elitist's fashion. That, along with the horrendous text fonds and repugnant color schemes, not to mention the ugliest coding presentation and the endless assult on my nerves launched by thousands of those ugly bees all over the textbook, literally made me nauseous (really). I think those were more than enough reasons to hate the book whether the actual contents were good.

The latest edition (5th) eradicates all sins, and rectifies the lows of the past editions. Well, except the bees... Even the bees manage to look kind of cute in light of the newest improvement.

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Object-Oriented Programming in C++ - Robert Lafore - Adobe Reader ...
it looks good . I bought turkish version

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There are many books available in market. But what suit me is mcgrawhill C++ 4th Edition written by Herbert Schildt.

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In my very limited view of C++, I find Accelerated C++ and Ruminations on C++ very beneficial to the newest C++'ers.

Its such a great introduction to the understanding of the principles of the language.

Thank-you Andrew Koenig and Barbara Moo..I appreciated yours words of wisdom.

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Finally, as it turns out to be in all programming languages, there are lots of books.The whole point is what is reader aiming at and what is reader's programming background.If someone is a beginner, he can read a "Teach Yourself xxx in xxx hours or days", but according to my (not that long but surely enough) experience, is usually a better choice for some kind of refresher. It is very difficult if not impossible, to get the nuts and bolts of a language from these books, because simply they have not been written, with this in mind.But they have their own value and I believe that it is not fair for anyone, to call them useless. The "For Dummies" series can be of some help for a beginner too, but they surpass the (relatively close) to intermediate level very hardly (if at all).But again, they fulfill what they 've been made for: a simple intro to a programming language.Personally, I have a very positive opinion about Deitel series and Schaum's Outlines series.Some time ago I was reading "C How to program" from Deitel and I found that my hard study of this book, paid me back with much ease to learn the basics to intermediate of C++.I think that "C++ How to program" is excellent too, and have many exercises like all the books in this series, going beyond intermediate level and revealing many aspects that other books don't.A very important "extra" in this series, is that guides reader in a very education-oriented way, to learn how to read code.And the subtlety in many programming aspects, of the example and exercise programs, makes every serious reader to learn reading code better, something that is literally invaluable, for a programmer's career.
Not only well known code tricks and "secret tricks" that they are not secret at all, like other books do. Schaum's books, helped me a lot as a beginner, too. Someone can say that now most of them are outdated, but are surely still useful, for anyone to master the basics and a little beyond( I am referring to C and C++ again).And I think that other really excellent books like Wiley's (2004 to now), are again very useful and helpful.The best way is to read (or even skim), every book, if you think has something to offer. The roadmap of learning for a programming language, depends heavily on the two things I mentioned at the beginning and can take many different paths along the way.In my humble opinion, the rule is simple: exclude nothing.There is no single book that can make even the smarter person on the planet, a good programmer, because this requires much effort in order to be achieved and practical experience which cannot be gained only by study. So, what anyone serious about all this has to do, is to set the ground with hard study and then when asked to, go from there.

Edited by wonder87: n/a

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Not sure if this book has been mentioned or not yet, but I quite liked
"Data Structures And Algorithms in C++" (Author: Adam Drozdeck)

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Inside The C++ Object Model by Stanley B. Lippman

I recommend this book for one reason even through its a very good book from cover to cover, it explains in simple terms why polymorphism, in C++, requires pointers or references to objects...If your interested check out page 29.

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Following books are good for c++ Beginners :

C++ GUI Programming with Qt 3
C++ Reference Guide
ZooLib Cookbook
C++ in action
Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days

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Steven Prata. He has a couple books on c++
Loved them. Simple to read and clear.

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Sams Teach yourself C++ in 21 Days Second Edition...

Great book very detailed well writen.. IGNORE THE 21 DAYS.

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I don't think that listing one's favorite C++ books gives any real insight. Accordingly, I've written an article that explains what to look for in a C++ book. If you find these qualities, that's a book to avoid.

Votes + Comments
Unconsciously, these were exactly the red flags I've always watched for!
I wholeheartedly agree!
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You're welcome!

Since we're somewhat on the topic, are you planning a new edition for C++0x?

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Since we're somewhat on the topic, are you planning a new edition for C++0x?

It would be nice. There's another project I want to get done first. In addition, there's a slightly odd problem: The copyright to the book is held jointly by Barbara and AT&T, because I was working for AT&T at the time I wrote the book. This fact comes with the weird implication that I do not have the legal right to contract with the publisher for a revised edition; only Barbara and AT&T have that right and both of them must do so before the revision can proceed.

What makes this doubly weird is that so far the publisher has not been able to find anyone in AT&T who can figure out who has the legal right to sign such a contract. The original contract says that AT&T is required either to agree to a revision or hand the work off to someone else, but the company has been through so many reorganizations since then that no one seems to know whose job it is to do so.

We'll try harder to untangle it all after this other project is finished, which should be early next year.

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I like to read Effective C++ by Scott Meyers
c++ is thinking, ( bruce eckel)

I know Meyers and Eckel, and they're both good guys.

Between us (including Accelerated C++), we have three very different approaches to teaching C++. Some people may like one, some may like another. From my viewpoint as an author, the best thing to do is to play it safe and buy all three.

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Here's one I've not seen mentioned yet...

"C++ Essentials" by Sharam Hekmat, 14th July 2005
PragSoft Corporation

The author describes it as a concise introduction to C++ for beginners and without unnecessary verbosity. I wouldn't disagree.

The book and its tutorials are aimed at the Unix environment. However, anyone beginning to learn C++ in another environment will likely find this book a useful resource, provided they've already mastered the knack of compiling programs.

The book is just over 300 pages long. It's available in PDF format as a free download from PragSoft's website...

http://www.pragsoft.com/books/CppEssentials.pdf

(I have no affiliation with this company)

My personal favourite is "Effective C++", by Scott Meyers.

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"C++ Essentials" by Sharam Hekmat, 14th July 2005

For a book written seven years after the introduction of standard C++, you'd kind of expect the code to use standard C++ rather than pre-standard C++. I'll go ahead and call this book useless for learning modern C++ and only useful for purposes of history.

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Here's one I've not seen mentioned yet...

"C++ Essentials" by Sharam Hekmat, 14th July 2005
PragSoft Corporation

The author describes it as a concise introduction to C++ for beginners and without unnecessary verbosity. I wouldn't disagree.

I'm afraid I would. A quick search through the PDF file shows that it doesn't describe the standard-library vector template at all. I'll bet there are other similarly important facilities that it doesn't describe either.

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I'm really in to C++ now, and just started making a text based game. I want to buy a book, but I'm not sure which one I should buy. I'm up to about part 40 in this series of tutorials. What would you recommend?

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I'm really in to C++ now, and just started making a text based game. I want to buy a book, but I'm not sure which one I should buy. I'm up to about part 40 in this series of tutorials. What would you recommend?

I'd recommend reading this thread rather than replying to it with questions that are answered already.

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In China the most recommended book for a c++ beginner is <<c++ primer>>or <<c++ primer plus>>,but no more

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Programming in C++ by Dewhurst is also a good Book which also referred in my college days

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