Hi.

I know C#, but I want to venture out cautiously into the world of unmanaged code (reasons had).

Now, I want to learn C++ eventually, but I was thinking that I should learn the C language before, since if I'm not mistaken, C++ is itself an extension of the C language which adds some certain features.

I'm not asking whether I need to learn C first (I want to), but I want to know if that's a good idea, or what to look out for. Has anybody tried the same thing and have some advice for me?

Next, I'm asking to be pointed to a nice C tutorial. Where I can learn the basic stuff like variables, selection, types, functions etc.

Oh and one more thing. Is it true that to get objects you have to do it in C++?

>I want to know if that's a good idea, or what to look out for.
If your goal is C++, there's little point in side tracking yourself with C. But do keep in mind that C and C++ require different mindsets. Good C isn't necessarily good C++, and vice versa. Despite what you've heard, C and C++ are different languages.

>Has anybody tried the same thing and have some advice for me?
I learned C first. It didn't kill me.

>Next, I'm asking to be pointed to a nice C tutorial.
You'd be better off picking up The C Programming Language by Kernighan and Ritchie. Tutorials are too hit or miss, and that book has been the bible since the 70's.

>Is it true that to get objects you have to do it in C++?
No, but C++ certainly makes it more convenient.

Comments
Cool. YOu covered just about everything. :)

That book you spoke about, I did some research on it and the general consensus seems to be what you say. I also like that it was co-written by the language creator.

Uhm, do you know if a similar titled The C++ Language is as good? Spotted it on Amazon when i was looking at the first one.

>Uhm, do you know if a similar titled The C++ Language is as good?
Yes. Besides it, refer The Complete Reference C++ by Herbert Schildt.

>I also like that it was co-written by the language creator.
Indeed, and the reference half (which is the part I understand Ritchie wrote) is at a high enough level to be useful for all parties. The same can't be said about the ultimate reference, the C standard, which is written in painful and exacting legalese.

>do you know if a similar titled The C++ Language is as good?
Yes. It's also written by the language creator and follows a similar line of instruction. Both books are best suited to people who already have programming experience.

>Besides it, refer The Complete Reference C++ by Herbert Schildt.
No. Don't buy anything written by Herbie. He still needs to learn the language before trying to teach it. Besides, there are dozens of vastly superior books on C++. There's no reason to dig around at the bottom of the barrel.

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