I am going to develop a roadway traffic light simulator using java as my academic project. I have captured ideas about so from searching internets .I have to build a system which simulates a traffic network and the traffic flow is regulated using a fixed time controller first and then the same simulation is repeated using fuzzy logic based controller. But I cannot start my project as I only know the technique of programming in java and throughly studied the concept of fuzzy logic. So could anybody help me to design the class diagram ,methods and providing other helpful solutions.

The first thing you should do is work out EXACTLY what you want your program to do. Your explanation is still a little "fuzzy" on the details (pardon the pun!) Then go through and find all the unique nouns (things) in your detailed description - this will give you a rough idea of the classes you will need. The interaction beween the items in your description gives a rough indication of the methods you will need.

That should do for a start. Don't be afraid to spend a long time on writing out the description and getting to the "nuts and bolts" of the problem, as this will save you countless hours later on.

Cheers
darkagn

i have very short deadline for the project so could you please provide me the core idea od simulation

I'm afraid that at least that should be your job...
Not only part of the "we only give homework help to those who show effort" policy, but from there on we'll have a better idea of what you're willing to achieve and therefor we will be able to help you.

What darkagn said really works! It's not that hard and before you know it, you (and afterwards we) will understand much better what it actually is that you want to do AND what you don't want to do...

Black Box

If you took on more than you can swallow that's your problem, not ours.
If you wasted your time playing games when you should have been working on the assignment, that's your problem, not ours.

You say you know fuzzy logic, and know Java.
Now combine the two...

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